About the Blogger

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My name is Hala Furst, and I am a 3L. Before coming to Roger Williams I received a BA in Theatre Arts at the University of Minnesota. In the three years between graduating from college and arriving here in Bristol, RI, I worked as a hotel concierge for a luxury brand, a loan officer and mortgage...



Hala's Post

72 Hours in DC

Posted by Hala Furst on 10/13/2008 at 12:00 AM

I just returned from Washington DC and the Equal Justice Works Career Fair and Conference. DC is great. Whether you spend time in hip Adams Morgan, gentrified Georgetown, up on the Hill or at Dupont Circle, there is always something going on. It is a young city, with very few lifers. People come from all walks of life to work with, against, or beside the federal government, and it makes for an amazing mix of cultures. Not many are really from DC, but the steadfast few that are wear their city pride like a tattoo. It is a city built on power and influence, and if you can trade either you might just make it. New York might be the city that never sleeps, but DC is the city that gets called in the middle of the night to solve an international crisis. I’m pretty sure I want to check it out for the summer, maybe for a few years after that. And right there, I’ve narrowed my search, which is something I couldn’t have done before EJW.

Despite nearly missing my flight home, I returned happier than I have felt in a month. I was able to have formal interviews with two employers, informal interviews with 3 more employers, and submit my resume and do some serious table-talking with about 5 others. On top of that exposure, I got to spend the weekend in a room filled with other people who are committed to public interest law, and that felt really good. I know I may not get a job out of the event, but just knowing the work that is out there made it so much easier. It was great to see the vast array of public interest opportunities, hear people’s stories of how they got to where they are, and just hang out with new and different law students committed to similar causes. It is a small world, too. In just two days I ran into a co-worker from Seeds of Peace in 2002, a current 3L I used to go to middle and high school with in Wichita, KS, and the organizer of a public interest law retreat I went on last winter. It was great to reconnect and see how public interest law has woven these interesting and unexpected threads between us. So my advice is to network your brains out, campers, because you never know who you might meet, and how they might be able to help you.