About the Blogger

William's picture

William Wray is a 3L at Roger Williams Law. He attended Georgetown University and Brown University for undergraduate, graduating in 2010 with a degree in Middle East Studies. Throughout high school and college he was involved in Mock Trial, which kindled his interest in litigation. At Brown he...



William's Blog

Break

Posted by William Wray on 04/24/2011 at 05:48 PM

Down for a weekend wedding at Jekyll Island, GA. As the presence of an immaculately maintained pitch attests, Jekyll Island is one of the few remaining resorts in the USA where one can play croquet with a straight face. Numerous sepia portraits of bewigged gentlemen explain in visual shorthand that rich Europeans began relaxing here in the early 18th century, and continued to do so for centuries, pausing briefly only to convert the labor force from regular slaves to wage slaves in the mid 19th.

 

In the early 20th JP Morgan and his Merry Band of Plutocrats moved in. They built sprawling three story houses with 20+ rooms, and in evident ignorance of or perhaps rank contempt for common English, called them “cottages.” It is in these humble cottages - the only I've seen with drip molds and doric columns - that they along with Rhode Island's own Senator Aldrich spawned in some dark and grotesque ritual the Federal Reserve. That's probably the only black mark on the history of this sunny and surprisingly affordable getaway. And also maybe the slavery.

 

Occasionally the law student within will revolt at this 85 Fahrenheit indolence and shout a warning about the Legal Methods brief due in 48 hours or the exams that follow on its heels, but this is a voice easily silenced with a pool drink and a memory of RI's low-50's rainy clime.

 

I'll be glad to return to RW, though. The fact that 75% of my family plunked down below the Mason-Dixon has not made me any more than 0% Southern. I thus view unsolicited sweetness and hot globs of grits at breakfast with nothing more than polite suspicion. But while here I will 'Sir' 'Ma'am' and 'ya'll' as if born to this drawly culture, while building up a reserve of stony New England reclusiveness for the weeks ahead.