Blogs

Representing the Indigent

Posted by Larry Ritchie on 09/26/2014 at 10:47 AM

Keeping abreast of the criminal justice and evidence areas of the law can be a time-consuming proposition for a law professor.  Of course, I regularly read the Criminal Law Reporter and other periodicals.  However, being a member of the Criminal Justice Act Panel of Attorneys representing indigents in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit is an effective and satisfying way to keep current while also providing a service to the most needy and also, hopefully, to the courts. 

Practice Makes Perfect

Posted by Raquel Ortiz on 09/22/2014 at 10:12 AM

Attorneys maintain their knowledge of the law and legal practice skills through continuing legal education.

As 1Ls, law students begin to learn how to think and write like a lawyer, the foundations of the law, and basic legal research.  The library offers three instructional programs that supplement and augment first year legal research instruction, designed to help "practice make perfect" for legal research and office technology skills.

Pot Luck for Public Interest!

Posted by Laurie Barron on 09/15/2014 at 09:58 AM

How many students, alumni, faculty and staff can fit into the neither small nor large backyard of the Barron-Yelnosky home for the Fall Public Interest Pot Luck dinner?  Turns out at least 112. 

We'll Always Need Tax Lawyers...

Posted by Anthony Santoro on 09/08/2014 at 10:59 AM

Taxation! 

The mere thought is enough to strike fear into the hearts and minds of law students. Yet a hardy band of RWU grads has found that tax law can offer a promising career path. It does require some extra effort, though. In the years since I returned to full-time teaching, thirty or so of our graduates have moved on to earn LL.M.s in Taxation from some of the best graduate tax programs in the country – B.U., Villanova, Georgetown, Florida and Miami, among others.  This fall, two more RWU grads are joining that group.

Other Resources on Campus - Part 3 & Adventures in Oral Advocacy

Posted by Library Blog on 03/27/2015 at 08:37 AM

A few weeks ago, the Legal Beagle visited the RWU Architecture Library and its exciting collection. Not only do law students have access to the collection at the Architecture Library, but also to the collection of the University Library, located in the Learning Commons.

Mass Incarceration Bibliography

Posted by Library Blog on 03/19/2015 at 02:19 PM

Have you noticed the new display of books in the law library? The books being displayed are about or related to the topic of mass incarceration. The displayed collection also contains books written by two of the speakers at an upcoming symposium.

Other Resources on Campus - Part 2

Posted by Library Blog on 03/11/2015 at 11:45 AM

In Larry L. Teply’s Successfully Competing in U.S. Moot Court Competitions, the author recommends practicing oral arguments with a partner or by recording the practice session. If you are competing in a moot court competition this Spring and want to follow Teply’s advice, you might be interested to know that (free!) resources exist on the RWU campus to assist you.

Other Resources on Campus

Posted by Library Blog on 02/27/2015 at 03:24 PM

Despite the nearly-arctic temperatures, you may want to venture out beyond the walls of the law library and over two buildings to RWU’s School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation (SAAHP). The SAAHP building is home to the Architecture Library which has many interesting art and architecture-related resources in its collection (and what is considered one of the best, if not the best, historic preservation collection in New England).

Researching the Aaron Hernandez Trial

Posted by Library Blog on 02/20/2015 at 11:29 AM

While the Aaron Hernandez trial may not be capturing the attention of the nation in quite the same way that the O.J. Simpson trial did, it is getting some attention, at least locally. There are many news outlets, especially sports news outlets, who are covering the trial extensively.

Does typography matter?

Posted by Library Blog on 02/13/2015 at 08:33 AM

In Matthew Butterick’s 2010 book Typography for Lawyers: Essential Tools for Polished & Persuasive Documents, the author presents several compelling arguments for why typography, the art and technique of arranging printed material, should and does matter to readers, especially to readers of legal documents. He analogizes the typography of a legal document to the dress of a lawyer for an oral argument further stating, “In the same way that good speaking skills matter during an oral argument, good typography matters in a written document…Typography matters.