Blogs

Major Gift Propels RWU’s #2 Ranked Public Interest Program

Posted by David Logan on 10/27/2009 at 12:00 AM

We are extremely proud of the rich array of public interest programs offered at RWU, and the fact that our program is ranked #2 in New England by National Jurist magazine .  I am delighted to announce a major gift that will ensure the future of one of our important initiatives, our unique Pro Bono Collaborative.

Writing Scholarly Papers!

Posted by Library Blog on 10/23/2009 at 12:00 AM

In addition to texts for legal writing, the Law Library’s collection also has publications to consult for writing seminar papers.  These publications include Scholarly Writing for Law Students: Seminar Papers, Law Review Notes and Law Review Competition Papers, 3d ed. by Elizabeth Fajans and Mary Falk (Reserve, KF250 .F34 2005) and Academic Legal Writing: Law Review Articles, Student Notes, Seminar Papers, and Getting on Law Review, 3d ed.

Top Comparative Law Scholars Hold Annual Meeting at RWU

Posted by David Logan on 10/23/2009 at 12:00 AM

Roger Williams Law recently hosted the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Comparative Law, bringing to campus top scholars and teachers of Comp Law.  In the recent past, the conference was held at Cornell, Cal-Hastings, Tulane, Cal-Davis, Hawaii, and Michigan, and it was brought to RWU because of the good works of two of my RWU colleagues who specialize in Comp Law,

I hate greenbeans

Posted by Regina Curran on 10/21/2009 at 12:00 AM

It’s true, I do hate them. It started in kindergarten and to this day I still refuse to eat them out of protest. What does this have to do with law school you might ask? Nothing. Truly. But my friends have been bugging me to update my blog and it got me to thinking about my lack of focus right now. As a 3L I feel like I’m being pulled in a hundred different directions. I’ve got school (of course), the job I work, the job I’m hoping to find, obligations to friends and family, and school. I did say school twice, I because that’s where it should be.

Faculty Edges Students in Jeopardy

Posted by David Logan on 10/19/2009 at 12:00 AM

imageThe 2009 version of the annual throw-down between representatives of all 3 classes and the faculty was a nail biter.  It was a raucous crowd of well north of 150, each class with its own color and t-shirts adding to the high energy.

Guides to Law Library Study Aids Now on the Web!

Posted by Library Blog on 10/16/2009 at 12:00 AM

The Law Library’s collection has various study aids on numerous legal subject areas. These study aids include the West/Thomson Reuters hornbooks and nutshells, the LexisNexis ”Understanding...” series and Aspen Publishers Explanations and Examples series of study aids.  Current editions of these study aids are on Reserve while older editions are shelved in the law library stacks.

Heritage Pride

Posted by David Logan on 10/14/2009 at 12:00 AM

Last week, the School of Law had its Heritage Pride Celebration.  Here is a recap from Lydia Hanhardt, our Director of Diversity and Outreach:

Off-campus Access to Law Library Databases!

Posted by Library Blog on 10/08/2009 at 12:00 AM

The Law Library subscribes to various databases for legal research.  Among them are the BNA subject databases such as U.S.

Fall Programs Tackle Supreme Court Nominations and Gun Control

Posted by David Logan on 10/06/2009 at 12:00 AM

The new academic year brings with it a chance for students and faculty to hear from experts on the most pressing issues of the day, and fall 2009 is no exception.

Any Given Saturday

Posted by Hala Furst on 10/03/2009 at 12:00 AM

As I type this, I’m sitting up on the third floor, in the Moot Court cubicle, taking a break from researching an 8th Amendment argument for the Nationals Competition. It is raining cats and dogs outside, which I don’t mind, since I’m relegated to spending this weekend tethered to 5 pounds of westlaw printouts. The wind is howling, the timer on the motion sensor lights keeps going off, and I’m trying to figure out where the evolving standards of decency in American punishment jurisprudence has left us.