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The Legal Beagle’s favorite book and that of dog lovers everywhere is Every Dog’s Legal Guide: A Must Have Book for Your Owner by Mary Randolph (KF390.5 .D6 R36 2005). His favorite movie is about the crime fighting pooch, Underdog! His current hero is Uno, the beagle who won Best in Show at the...



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Legal Beagle's Posts

Posted by Library Blog
12/15/2015 at 12:39 PM
Every year around this time we turn on the TV, the computer, and/or the radio and we hear about the war on Christmas. The Legal Beagle is a non-partisan dog and doesn’t want to have political conversations around the holiday table. Instead of blogging about the so-called War on Christmas, instead we will discuss researching the recent war on Christmas lights. According to a 2014 press release, “The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates there were 15,000 injuries involving holiday decorating seen in emergency departments nationwide during November and December 2012. “ The...
Posted by Library Blog
12/04/2015 at 12:28 PM
According to the US Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, “The average Thanksgiving long-distance trip length is 214 miles, compared with 275 miles over the Christmas/New Year’s holiday. For the remainder of the year, average trip distance is 261 miles.” While there are many stories about air travel travails (missing baggage, delayed flights, unruly passengers, etc.), there is one book a law student can read to soothe any fears about upcoming travel plans. Cancelled, Delayed, Grounded: Law for the Frustrated Air Traveler by Cecil C. Kuhne III is available in the...
Posted by Library Blog
11/17/2015 at 12:38 PM
It’s beginning to feel a lot like finals. The end of the semester is always filled with studying and outlining and stress. The Legal Beagle has several suggestions for ways to cope with the end of the semester crunch time: 1. Use the library’s study resources: If you prefer online study aids, try the CALI lessons available at http://www.cali.org/. If you prefer print resources, the Law Library’s staff has prepared guides to the major study aids in the library’s collection. The guides are by subject area, keyed to the curriculum and available at http://law.rwu.edu/library/research/study-aids....
Posted by Library Blog
11/13/2015 at 10:29 AM
New England is known far and wide for its association with the Thanksgiving holiday. Whether this is your first Thanksgiving in New England or just your most recent Thanksgiving in New England, here is a quiz to give you a break from outlining! 1. True or False: Cranberries bounce.2. What percentage of the pumpkins processed in the United States in a year are grown in Illinois?3. 2008 was the International Year of the ________4. True or False: There has been a Nantucket Sea Monster balloon in the Macy’s parade.5. Who has the most rushing yards in a NFL Thanksgiving Day football game? Whether...
Posted by Library Blog
11/13/2015 at 10:05 AM
One of the librarians noticed this story about overcoming fear which was recently featured in the online ABA Journal and remarked at how well it handled the issues of lawyer stress and fear. It states, “Fear has become part of the legal culture because lawyers, like soldiers, often feel engaged in battle.” Not only do lawyers feel the pressures of stress and fear, but law students do, too. Have you noticed the sign on the law school television display screens (with unicorns!) about coloring with the librarians? If so, we hope you have stopped by to color with us! If not, we hope you will...
Posted by Library Blog
11/06/2015 at 10:40 AM
A frequently debated issue in criminal law is the unreliability of eyewitness testimony. It is also a particularly interesting topic to research because it relates to science, psychology, criminal justice, and law. Our library contains several resources on this topic, both in digital resources and in our print collection, most notably Elizabeth F. Loftus, James M. Doyle, and Jennifer E. Dysart’s Eyewitness Testimony: Civil and Criminal. The Criminal Law Reporter (Bloomberg BNA) allows you to identify and track the most recent news and cases on the subject. On November 2, this publication...
Posted by Library Blog
10/30/2015 at 11:21 AM
According to the United States Courts website, “[e]lectronic media coverage of criminal proceedings in federal courts has been expressly prohibited under Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 53 since the criminal rules were adopted in 1946.” Starting in July, 2011, fourteen federal trial courts voluntarily took part in an experiment to evaluate the effect of cameras in courtrooms. The data collection portion of the pilot concluded this summer with the videos posted online until the Judicial Conference considers recommendations regarding the pilot. More information about the project can be found...
Posted by Library Blog
10/23/2015 at 10:20 AM
Halloween is a time for all things spooky, even court cases and law books. In fact, a magazine called NWLawyer compiled a top ten list of cases to spook you. More locally, there was a court case a few years ago which was Halloween-themed! A review of our catalog uncovered several scary titles in the law library collection, including The Sleepy Lagoon Murder Case, Of Murder and Madness, and Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America's Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes. Possibly the scariest law book title of them all is Body Parts: Property Rights and the Ownership of Human Biological...
Posted by Library Blog
10/16/2015 at 09:24 AM
As we all learned in elementary school, Haiku is a form of traditional Japanese poetry with a 17-syllable verse form (5, 7, and 5). What you might not have learned in grade school is legal haiku. Haiku Decisis is a website created by Joshua Auriemma which features haiku extracted from a random Supreme Court opinion. It is like a random Supreme Court haiku generator. The haiku were identified using a computer algorithm and some of them are awesome. If you want to try your hand at writing haiku, the ABA’s Young Lawyer Division and ABA Law Student Division sponsor an annual haiku contest where...
Posted by Library Blog
10/09/2015 at 08:36 AM
On Friday, October 2, the RWU Law Library hosted the Law Librarians of New England (LLNE) Fall Meeting. The theme was Successfully Supporting & Igniting Innovation and the meeting was a great success. We gathered with law librarians all over New England and discussed innovations in law, in libraries, in legal education, in legal practice, and in organizational culture. The event’s plenary speaker was Stanford’s Margaret Hagan who dazzled us with her insights about promoting and supporting innovation. In preparing for the event, one of the librarians downloaded and tried out one of Hagan’s...