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The Legal Beagle’s favorite book and that of dog lovers everywhere is Every Dog’s Legal Guide: A Must Have Book for Your Owner by Mary Randolph (KF390.5 .D6 R36 2005). His favorite movie is about the crime fighting pooch, Underdog! His current hero is Uno, the beagle who won Best in Show at the...



Legal Beagle's Posts

Posted by Library Blog
09/06/2013 at 01:13 PM
If mobile devices do not play an important role in your daily activities as a law student, they will when you become a lawyer.  Here are a few resources to consult for optimizing their use.    The RWU Law Guide: Mobile Apps for Law Students offers insights on apps for legal research, creating documents, capturing and editing content, storing content, and mobile security for a variety of mobile devices. Tim Baran of Legal Productivity has compiled a list of “6 Useful Sites for Android Loving Lawyers” and “8 Great Sites for Mac Loving Lawyers.” Among his recommended sites are:...
Posted by Library Blog
08/29/2013 at 10:34 AM
Labor Day, celebrated yearly for more than a century, is more than just a holiday marking the end of summer.  It celebrates the achievements of the American worker.  The History Channel and the U.S. Department of Labor are great sources for information about the history of the holiday and the labor movement in the United States. If you are interested in a career in labor or employment law, you might want to read Labor and Employment Law: A Career Guide by Harvard Law School or the Vault Guide to Labor & Employment Law (Career, KF299 .L3 G78 2003).  You might even consider...
Posted by Library Blog
08/23/2013 at 03:17 PM
August 28 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.  His speech was delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  According to the Our Documents website, the march was the largest demonstration for human rights in U.S. history at that time and was viewed as a rare display of unity among various civil rights organizations.  The event started with a rally at the Washington Monument featuring several celebrities and musicians.  Next, participants marched the National Mall...
Posted by Library Blog
08/16/2013 at 09:26 AM
Twenty-years ago on August 23, the Roger Williams University School of Law opened its doors for the first day of classes.  Our Founding Dean was Professor of Law Anthony J. Santoro.  While orientation for the incoming students was underway, Dean Santoro made the announcement of his new appointment as President of the Roger Williams College.  John E. Ryan was appointed Dean of the RWU School of Law in September, 1993.   Founding faculty still teaching at the law school are: Professors Louise Teitz (currently on a leave of absence), Bruce Kogan, and Michael Yelnosky....
Posted by Library Blog
04/26/2013 at 01:08 PM
The Law School, the Office of Career Development, and the various student organizations offer numerous networking events throughout the academic year and even during the summer months.  By participating in these events, you have opportunities to meet movers and shakers in the state’s legal community and non-profits as well as judges, and prominent state and local politicians.  Also, attending these networking events enables you to become better acquainted with the law school administration, faculty, and staff in attendance. Here are some resources for you to consult for enhancing...
Posted by Library Blog
04/18/2013 at 01:22 PM
A practicing attorney’s toolkit should contain the court rules for the jurisdictions in which she is practicing.  Thomson Reuters and LexisNexis publish compilations of state and federal court rules. In addition to the text of the rules, there may be Committee/Reporter/Compiler Notes offering a “legislative history” of the rule.  The “Notes” typically indicate an adoption of or a variation from the federal rule and might contain references to case law that prompted a revision to the rule.  As these are annotated publications, there will be “Notes of Decisions” to cases in which...
Posted by Library Blog
04/11/2013 at 01:18 PM
In addition to the resources of the Office of Career Development, you can use LexisNexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law for job searching and career development.  These are great services for researching attorneys, law firms and companies such as cases involved in and news stories about. Bloomberg Law’s  “Career Insights” contains advice, suggestions, and tips from practitioners on topics such as career options, interviews, networking, your job search, professional development, and summer employment.  “Ask the Hiring Attorney” series of “Qs & As” are a must read before an...
Posted by Library Blog
03/28/2013 at 02:52 PM
Our nation’s capital is a “happening” place!  For those who like to keep abreast of the activity of the three branches of government or want to work in one of them, here are some resources for you. The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times contains news on “law, lobbying, politics, crime, courts, business and culture.” Check out this blog for its coverage of U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments and decisions. Roll Call “has been the source of news on Capitol Hill since 1955.”  Useful for a writing project is news about federal policy by topical area. SCOTUSblog  is an amazing resource...
Posted by Library Blog
03/21/2013 at 11:29 AM
Free to students up to six months after graduation, the Bloomberg Law service offers a wide-variety of primary legal materials and secondary resources.  There is even a citator (like Shepard’s or KeyCite).  Secondary sources on Bloomberg Law include those published by the American Bar Association, BNA (e.g. topical reports) and Practising Law Institute.  Transactional law resources on Bloomberg include EDGAR and DealMaker documents and clauses, drafting guides and transactional treatises. Bloomberg Law also provides extensive coverage of court dockets and filings from courts...
Posted by Library Blog
03/06/2013 at 05:17 PM
The Law Library’s specialized Reference Collection is located to the right as you enter the library, in four stand-alone book cases, together with shelving that sits adjacent to the Main Computer Lab. You can use the resources in the Reference Collection to look up the meaning of a legal term of art, obtain tips for polishing a writing piece, find a pithy quote, or locate a biography of a judge for a clerkship, including contact information. One such gem within the Law Library’s reference collection is The Encyclopedia of Associations.  On-campus access to this resource is provided by...