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The Legal Beagle’s favorite book and that of dog lovers everywhere is Every Dog’s Legal Guide: A Must Have Book for Your Owner by Mary Randolph (KF390.5 .D6 R36 2005). His favorite movie is about the crime fighting pooch, Underdog! His current hero is Uno, the beagle who won Best in Show at the...



Legal Beagle's Posts

Posted by Library Blog
04/11/2013 at 01:18 PM
In addition to the resources of the Office of Career Development, you can use LexisNexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law for job searching and career development.  These are great services for researching attorneys, law firms and companies such as cases involved in and news stories about. Bloomberg Law’s  “Career Insights” contains advice, suggestions, and tips from practitioners on topics such as career options, interviews, networking, your job search, professional development, and summer employment.  “Ask the Hiring Attorney” series of “Qs & As” are a must read before an...
Posted by Library Blog
03/28/2013 at 02:52 PM
Our nation’s capital is a “happening” place!  For those who like to keep abreast of the activity of the three branches of government or want to work in one of them, here are some resources for you. The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times contains news on “law, lobbying, politics, crime, courts, business and culture.” Check out this blog for its coverage of U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments and decisions. Roll Call “has been the source of news on Capitol Hill since 1955.”  Useful for a writing project is news about federal policy by topical area. SCOTUSblog  is an amazing resource...
Posted by Library Blog
03/21/2013 at 11:29 AM
Free to students up to six months after graduation, the Bloomberg Law service offers a wide-variety of primary legal materials and secondary resources.  There is even a citator (like Shepard’s or KeyCite).  Secondary sources on Bloomberg Law include those published by the American Bar Association, BNA (e.g. topical reports) and Practising Law Institute.  Transactional law resources on Bloomberg include EDGAR and DealMaker documents and clauses, drafting guides and transactional treatises. Bloomberg Law also provides extensive coverage of court dockets and filings from courts...
Posted by Library Blog
03/06/2013 at 05:17 PM
The Law Library’s specialized Reference Collection is located to the right as you enter the library, in four stand-alone book cases, together with shelving that sits adjacent to the Main Computer Lab. You can use the resources in the Reference Collection to look up the meaning of a legal term of art, obtain tips for polishing a writing piece, find a pithy quote, or locate a biography of a judge for a clerkship, including contact information. One such gem within the Law Library’s reference collection is The Encyclopedia of Associations.  On-campus access to this resource is provided by...
Posted by Library Blog
02/27/2013 at 07:26 PM
For those who are interested in a career in education or in education law, the Law Library offers various resources for your use.  Here are five selected resources to check out. The Chronicle of Higher Education is the publication offering the latest news, commentary and essays about public, private and community colleges and universities.  You can browse jobs by position type or conduct a keyword search.   Access to the Chronicle of Higher Education is controlled by IP address, so be sure to use the link from our Digital Resources page to get to the publication. Ursula...
Posted by Library Blog
02/22/2013 at 10:16 AM
Due to an aging population, a growing area of law practice is elder law.  The 2013 February issue of the Student Lawyer includes the cover story Exploring Growing Areas of Law.  The growing areas of law mentioned in the article are elder law, insurance law, and foreclosure work. Profiled in the article are two elder law attorneys whose work involves helping families navigate a maze of estate, health care, financial, and other issues faced by their aged loved ones. They point out that it takes a very special personality to practice elder law because very detailed rules are being...
Posted by Library Blog
02/12/2013 at 10:04 AM
Taking Trial Advocacy? Participating in trial team?  Intend to pursue a career as a litigator? Check out the resources offered by the Law Library for opening statements and closing arguments, direct and cross-examinations, motions, and jury instructions. Search the Law Library’s WebCatalog by keyword for recent publications by the National Institute of Trial Advocacy, the ABA Section of Litigation as well as many other publishers. To hone your trial and appellate advocacy skills, sign up to access the CVN Law School  to watch the video of civil litigation or trial advocacy video...
Posted by Library Blog
01/30/2013 at 05:23 PM
Since its founding in 1996, the Feinstein Institute for Legal Service has provided hundreds of RWU School of Law students with varied and numerous opportunities for pro bono service that benefit people in the local communities and beyond.  If you are interested in learning about others in the legal profession who are passionately committed to providing pro bono service, here is a list of recent publications in the Law Library along with other resources from the American Bar Association. Careers in Animal Law: Welfare, Protection, and Advocacy (KF299.A55 E37 2011) Building Your Practice...
Posted by Library Blog
01/24/2013 at 05:09 PM
John Chandler and Brian Boone, both senior litigators at top law firms, recently debated the correct past tense of “plead” in a post for Legal Technology News.  In “War of the Words: Pleaded vs. Pled,” Attorney Chandler states his reasons for using "pled" while Attorney Boone makes his case for the use of "pleaded."   Attorney Chandler says that while “pleaded” is fine on paper, lawyers use “pled” while in court.  According to him, “pled” sounds more pleasing to the ear.   Attorney Chandler notes the results of two polls conducted by AbovetheLaw in which a...
Posted by Library Blog
01/22/2013 at 02:00 PM
  The Law Library now offers even more access to recently published books via the Proquest ebrary.  There are more than 70,000 e-books in 15 major subject areas.  The law publications cover various topics in antitrust, business, environmental, immigration, international, history, litigation, and many more.   Searching ebrary is easy with just a few keywords or sophisticated with several ways to narrow your search such as by author, subject headings, or year.  You can search within the book, copy text, print pages, and save citations to RefWorks or EndNote.  ...