All Blog Posts

Posted by David Logan
11/15/2011 at 11:20 AM
The most recent edition of our flagship intramural forensic competition was, as so often in the past, a display of supremely prepared and talented finalists, before the Justices of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, in our own courtroom.  Nick Nybo had to make a tough argument: that the Supreme Court of the United States would create an exception to its controversial decision in Smith v. Oregon, and recognize a parent’s right to refuse to follow a school ban on foods that had religious significance to members of a small religious sect. Will Wray defended the rule as a legitimate, and...
Posted by David Logan
12/16/2010 at 01:00 AM
A key indicator of a law school’s ability to produce excellent boots-on-the-ground lawyers is its student performances in moot court competitions – intramural, regional and beyond. So it’s my happy privilege to report some stellar performances in that area. On November 21, a team of three RWU Law students – 3Ls Amy Broderick, Robert Cavanaugh, and John Meara – advanced to the finals of the Northeast Regional Tournament of the National Moot Court Competition, the largest forensic event in the country. The RWU Law team beat Vermont and Syracuse to advance to the semi-finals, where they pulled...
Posted by David Logan
03/31/2010 at 10:00 AM
3L Ron Rose (Manlius, NY) and 2L J.P. Pruett (Harrisonburg, Va.) knew they had their work cut out for them; a team from mighty Duke stood between them and the championship in the twelfth annual Wechsler Moot Court Competition, the only national event to focus on substantive Criminal Law. Sponsored by the University of Buffalo Law School, this year’s competition involved issues arising under a Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act. Among the law schools represented were the University of Georgia, the University of Wisconsin, the University of Maryland, the University of Kansas...
Posted by David Logan
11/16/2009 at 01:00 AM
One of the highlights of fall semesters at RWU Law is the annual visit of the Rhode Island Supreme Court.  The Court comes to campus to preside over the final round of our flagship internal Moot Court Competition, named after a deeply respected member of our faculty, the late Esther Clark. The case involved a sweeping youth curfew in a hypothetical town, which was challenged on the grounds that it violated both substantive due process (the right to travel) and the equal protection clause (unduly burdening a suspect class—minors).  The finalists were 2Ls Amy Broderick and John Meara...