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Blog Archive for %3

Posted by Heather O'Connor
03/31/2010 at 12:12 PM
First year you have no choice as to what classes you take or what your schedule will be like.  You will be assigned to one of three sections.  The people in this section will be your classmates, in every class, for the rest of the year.  So make friends.  These are the people you will need to rely on if you miss class and need notes, have questions about an assignment, or just want to talk something out.  The great thing about the students at this school is that the majority of the other students are willing to help you out in these instances.  It's not so...
Posted by David Logan
03/31/2010 at 09:00 AM
3L Ron Rose (Manlius, NY) and 2L J.P. Pruett (Harrisonburg, Va.) knew they had their work cut out for them; a team from mighty Duke stood between them and the championship in the twelfth annual Wechsler Moot Court Competition, the only national event to focus on substantive Criminal Law. Sponsored by the University of Buffalo Law School, this year’s competition involved issues arising under a Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act. Among the law schools represented were the University of Georgia, the University of Wisconsin, the University of Maryland, the University of Kansas...
Posted by David Logan
03/22/2010 at 11:00 PM
On Tuesday, February 23, the Roger Williams University School of Law conducted its second United States Supreme Court swearing-in ceremony. A dozen grads from our earliest years (an applicant must have been admitted to practice for a period of at least three years in order to qualify) had a remarkable experience.  A number of them got together the night before at a reception hosted by the D.C. Chapter of our Law Alumni Association, and had a chance to catch up with some of their many classmates who are working in the area, as well as chatting with U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse,...
Posted by David Logan
03/18/2010 at 09:26 AM
We were delighted to learn that Providence Mayor David Cicilline has appointed RWU Law’s Jorge Elorza, an Associate Professor of Law, to the Housing Court.  The Mayor lauded Jorge’s commitment to helping the poor among us find justice in the complex legal system. This will enable him to continue to blend his academic interest in housing issues (he teaches the survey course on Property and an elective on Housing Law and Policy) with the real world of how the law actually works in practice, a boon to both his students and litigants. Below is our press release and links to earlier...
Posted by Heather O'Connor
03/12/2010 at 01:48 PM
How do you know if you’re doing the right thing?  Although this seems to be the main question of being in law school regarding so many issues, I am asking it in another realm. I have three kids.  I am divorced, so although my ex gets visitation, I generally raise them on my own.  I knew I was taking a giant leap when I went back to school after my divorce, but figured it would be the best thing for my family in the long run, even if it made things more difficult presently.  Undergrad was a change, but it wasn’t too bad.  I put my youngest into preschool rather than...
Posted by Heather O'Connor
03/12/2010 at 01:44 PM
I remember when I started law school there was all this talk about study groups. Topics discussed were how to start one, how to organize your time during the study group, what to do if you’re not all your members aren’t on the same page, etc. I don’t really remember the issue coming up of whether or not you should even join a study group. It just seemed to be how you study in law school and what you should do. I watched as other students formed their study groups and began plunging into the typical law school study format. However, I did not feel as though a study group was for me. There...
Posted by Peter Eraca
03/12/2010 at 09:27 AM
As you may be aware, all 1Ls take a "legal methods" courts, essentially it is legal research and writing. The project for the spring semester is an appellate brief on some topic the LM faculty thinks up and gives us. The worst part about it is, it is the gatekeeper between you and spring break. Many students will stress for weeks on it, others won’t start even researching until the 11th hour. Now, my advice on the LM stuff, don’t wait to start, you’ll be sorry. It is virtually impossible, in my opinion, to churn out a "good" brief in 12 hours, beginning from scratch with no research done...
Posted by David Logan
03/12/2010 at 09:23 AM
A big part of success in law school, as in life, comes from the support and advice of others.  At RWU Law we recognize the importance of mentorship in guiding students and helping them learn about not just success stories, but also strategies for overcoming obstacles, understanding strengths, and making smart decisions.  Students find mentors in lots of places.  For many, the most influential mentors are not people who were assigned as part of a program.  Rather, they are folks who take the time to ask the right questions and serve as a sounding board.  That...
Posted by Peter Eraca
03/12/2010 at 09:12 AM
One of the biggest selling points of RW Law for me was the recreation center. It is at the doorstep of the law building, how much more convenient can that be? Before enrolling here, I would spend 3-4 day per week at the gym back home (I won’t plug which one), AND the college I worked for had a pool which helped my love of swimming (I swam competitively in high school). Therefore, some ability for me to get a work out in during the day was a large component of selecting a place I wanted to spend the subsequent 3 years of my life. Many law students will use the gym, particularly because it is...
Posted by David Logan
03/08/2010 at 12:00 AM
Two of the junior members of our terrific faculty learned last week that they had been awarded tenure pursuant to a unanimous vote of the Law Faculty, the Dean, the Board of Directors, and the University President, Dr. Roy J. Nirschel.  Courtney Cahill is a national expert in the complex issues surrounding same sexuality and the law, using her skills as a close reader of texts, honed at Princeton, where she earned her PhD in Comparative Literature. Courtney was a stellar student at Yale Law School, where she served as Chief Essays Editor for the Yale Law Journal, and after graduation...