Blog Archive for %3

Posted by Library Blog
03/10/2010 at 01:00 AM
For those looking to be their own boss, the Law Library offers a variety of publications for you to consult.  These books are located in the Law Library’s Career Collection and can be checked out for three weeks.  How to Start & Build a Law Practice by Jay Foonberg (KF300 .F66 2004) provides the basics on selecting a location for your office and equipping as well as obtaining clients and setting fees. Flying Solo: a Survival Guide for the Solo and Small Firm Lawyer by William Gibson (KF300 .F58 2005) contains contributions by practitioners offering solutions to various problems...
Posted by David Logan
03/08/2010 at 01:00 AM
Two of the junior members of our terrific faculty learned last week that they had been awarded tenure pursuant to a unanimous vote of the Law Faculty, the Dean, the Board of Directors, and the University President, Dr. Roy J. Nirschel.  Courtney Cahill is a national expert in the complex issues surrounding same sexuality and the law, using her skills as a close reader of texts, honed at Princeton, where she earned her PhD in Comparative Literature. Courtney was a stellar student at Yale Law School, where she served as Chief Essays Editor for the Yale Law Journal, and after graduation...
Posted by Library Blog
03/04/2010 at 01:00 AM
There are numerous blogs authored by law professors and others in legal education (e.g. academic support) from across the United States. The Justia.com Blawg Directory contains links to approximately two hundred law professor blogs. What do law professors blog about?  Law professors blog about their area of teaching and scholarly research.  They blog about controversial court cases and legal personalities.  Their blogs contain analysis and commentary on issues and developments in the law.  Some professors even delve into issues in legal education such as writing and...
Posted by David Logan
03/03/2010 at 01:00 AM
Last week, our own Professor Peter Margulies – a widely acknowledged expert on laws governing torture, terrorism and other cutting-edge fields of central relevance in today’s volatile political climate – was interviewed by the National Law Journal, featured in a podcast for SCOTUSblog, and appeared on a panel at the Georgetown Law School discussing a fascinating terror case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court. The case in question is Holder v. Humanitarian Law Project, argued last Tuesday, Feb. 23, which asks the court to consider whether several key terms in the federal laws...