All Blog Posts

Posted by David Logan
10/14/2009 at 12:00 AM
Last week, the School of Law had its Heritage Pride Celebration.  Here is a recap from Lydia Hanhardt, our Director of Diversity and Outreach: Thursday, October 8 was not an ordinary night at the law school.  When I walked down to the lower level of the building I could feel the activity and energy in the room.  The Multicultural Law Students Association (MCLSA) was hosting its third annual Heritage Pride Celebration.  I remember the first celebration two years ago; there were about 30 students and staff members all wearing our “MCLSA Celebrates _(fill in your)_ Culture” t...
Posted by Library Blog
10/08/2009 at 12:00 AM
The Law Library subscribes to various databases for legal research.  Among them are the BNA subject databases such as U.S. Law Week, HeinOnline’s Law Journal Library, the Foreign Law Guide, LexisNexis Congressional, the Making of Modern Law: Legal Treatises 1800 - 1926, and the United Nations Treaty Collection.  Use of these databases is restricted to faculty, staff and currently enrolled students of the School of Law. To access these databases from off-campus, you will need to use the library’s proxy server. Click here for instructions for setting up your browser to use the proxy...
Posted by David Logan
10/06/2009 at 12:00 AM
The new academic year brings with it a chance for students and faculty to hear from experts on the most pressing issues of the day, and fall 2009 is no exception. Professor Michael Gerhardt offered “An Insider’s View on the Sotomayor Confirmation.” Mike was my colleague at Wake Forest and is now the Ashe Professor of Constitutional Law and Director of the Center for Law and Government at the University of North Carolina School of Law.  He served as Special Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee for the Senate’s consideration of President Obama’s nomination Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the...
Posted by Hala Furst
10/03/2009 at 12:00 AM
As I type this, I’m sitting up on the third floor, in the Moot Court cubicle, taking a break from researching an 8th Amendment argument for the Nationals Competition. It is raining cats and dogs outside, which I don’t mind, since I’m relegated to spending this weekend tethered to 5 pounds of westlaw printouts. The wind is howling, the timer on the motion sensor lights keeps going off, and I’m trying to figure out where the evolving standards of decency in American punishment jurisprudence has left us. Not every weekend is like this, though. Last weekend I traveled down to New York to spend a...
Posted by Library Blog
10/02/2009 at 12:00 AM
From the ABA Journal’s website is a recent story about Florida U.S. District Court Judge Gregory Presnell who criticized attorney David Glasser’s motion for dismissal as “riddled with unprofessional grammatical and typographical errors that nearly render the entire motion incomprehensible.” Judge Presnell also criticized attorney Glasser for failing to obtain a stipulation of dismissal from the defendant as required by the procedural rules and ordered him to re-read both the local and federal rules in their entirety.  The legal tabloid AbovetheLaw provides Judge Presnell’s mark-up...
Posted by David Logan
09/30/2009 at 12:00 AM
The hectic life of a law dean leaves little time for scholarly reflection.  Nevertheless, when I was asked to participate in a First Amendment workshop sponsored by the Southeast Association of Law Schools this summer, I agreed because for some time I have been interested in how the law adapts to changes in how news is disseminated.  (I wrote an essay on the “24-hour news cycle” that appeared in a symposium on the impact of technology on Media Law while I was still on the faculty at Wake Forest: ALL MONICA, ALL OF THE TIME: THE 24-HOUR NEWS CYCLE AND THE PROOF OF CULPABILITY IN...
Posted by David Logan
09/25/2009 at 12:00 AM
One of the most pressing social justice issues in the United States is the fate of the millions of people who are swept up by the immigration system.  And while the issue of undocumented workers is typically associated with states that share a border with Mexico, the burgeoning immigrant population in Southeastern New England has raised similar concerns in our area. In fact, within the last year there have been major raids of undocumented workers in nearby New Bedford, Massachusetts and at all of the state courthouses in Rhode Island.  In addition to these high-profile events, there...
Posted by Library Blog
09/25/2009 at 12:00 AM
During the academic year, all students receive a weekly email from the Associate Law Librarian Lucinda Harrison-Cox containing highlights from BNA’s U.S. Law Week database.  Updated weekly, BNA’s U.S. Law Week is the premier database for news about recently decided federal and state cases and activities of the federal agencies.  Also included within the database is legal news about the President and the U.S. Congress. The U.S. Law Week’s Supreme Court Today database tracks the activities of the U.S. Supreme Court during its current term. A notable feature of U.S. Law Week is the...
Posted by David Logan
09/22/2009 at 12:00 AM
In partnership with the Rhode Island Sea Grant College Program, the RWU Marine Affairs Institute hires law students as Sea Grant Law Fellows to conduct legal research and analysis for government agencies, industry and non-profit organizations like local governments. Fellows work on timely legal issues, honing their legal research and writing skills while acquiring hands-on application of classroom knowledge. Constituents benefit from receiving balanced, neutral research while also providing students with real world experience.  Below are summaries of summer, 2009 Law Fellow projects:...
Posted by Library Blog
09/18/2009 at 12:00 AM
As you use LexisNexis and Westlaw for your legal research, the Law Library staff encourages you to reduce the amount of paper you print from the LexisNexis and the Westlaw printers located in the Law Library’s Print Center. For starters, consider using the double-sided LexisNexis printer (label # 710305) or the double-sided Westlaw printer (label #S5443). Both LexisNexis and Westlaw enable you to print a cite list of your research results or restrict the portions (also referred to as “fields”) of the document(s) to view which in turn will limit what you print. When using LexisNexis to search...