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Posted by Netti Vogel
07/19/2016 at 09:21 PM
Later this month, Democrats will meet in Philadelphia to nominate a woman as the party’s candidate for president.  Unrelated to political partisanship, this historic event highlights the dramatic changes undergone by women in our society — changes I have witnessed and experienced firsthand.  Coincidentally, Hillary Clinton and I were born the same year, in the same city and raised a stone’s throw away from each other, although we did not know each other.  We were children of the 1950s, teens of the 1960s, and feminist activists of the 1970s.  We grew up in a male-dominated...
Posted by Michael Yelnosky
07/08/2016 at 05:01 PM
A note I sent to the student body of RWU Law today: Good Afternoon Sadly, communities across the country continue to be ravaged by the use of deadly force by police officers against people of color.  The recent instances in Louisiana and Minnesota are all the more disturbing because the shootings or their aftermath were captured on video. I went numb last night as I watched Philando Castile bleeding to death in the passenger seat of a car driven by his girlfriend, who said the couple, with a child in the back seat, had been pulled over for a broken tail light. Mr. Castile’s name joins...
Posted by David Logan
07/07/2016 at 10:39 AM
One of the great things about RWU Law is the initiative that our students display by reaching out to the world outside of law school.  One such example was a basketball tournament featuring teams of law students and  teams of police officers.        Conceived and organized by Arwa Noorali ’16, the indefatigable President of the Criminal Law Society, the goal was to have fun while raising money in memory of police officers killed in the line of duty.  Working with the New England branch of “COPS” (Concerns of Police Survivors), and named in honor of Sgt....
Posted by Michael Yelnosky
06/17/2016 at 12:54 PM
Last Sunday, when the scope of the tragedy at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando began to emerge, I sent the following email to the student body: Tragically, once again Americans are mourning the loss of life caused by a senseless act of gun violence, this time apparently directed at members of the LGBTQ community.  We mourn the loss of life and wish the hate would go away. In addition, it is important that we – as lawyers and future lawyers – remain committed to the principle of equal justice for all and put our skills to work in pursuit of a more peaceful future for all. Since then,...
Posted by Eliza Vorenberg
06/07/2016 at 11:37 AM
The Pro Bono Collaborative celebrated its 10th anniversary on May 26 with balloons, confetti, birthday cake, bubbly and lots to brag about (see photos from the event below).  A small piloted program initiated in 2006 with a part-time Director, the PBC emerged from its first year with three unique pro bono projects involving three law firms and a handful of law students.  Now, ten years later, the PBC has facilitated 56 projects, engaged 26 law firms and over 130 private attorneys. Launched in response to the national crisis in legal services for the poor and the overwhelming need...
Posted by Michael Yelnosky
05/31/2016 at 02:10 PM
Commencement Week at RWU Law always begins the Monday before commencement at the Glen Manor House.  We had a beautiful night for the festivities as the Class of 2016 gathered on May 9, 2016 to celebrate with faculty and staff.  An awards ceremony kicked off the evening: Law Review Editor-in-Chief (Casey Charkowick), President of the Moot Court Board (Mikela Almeida), SBA President (Kyla Pecchia), Dean’s Academic Achievement Award (Jennifer Iarocci), Public Interest Award (Olabisi Maroofat Ashabi Davies), Pro Bono Collaborative Award (Rita Nerney and Judah Rome), Kathleen...
Posted by Michael Yelnosky
05/03/2016 at 11:18 AM
One hallmark of an RWU Law education is our remarkable connection to the bar, the bench, other branches of government, and businesses – both profit and non-profit.  During a student’s three years at the law school this means unparalleled externship opportunities, superb adjunct faculty, and programs that regularly bring leaders in the bench, bar, government, and business to the law school.  These connections also translate into increased market power for students when they graduate and enter the job market.  Having interned for a federal judge while in law school, for example...
Posted by Michael Yelnosky
04/26/2016 at 11:40 AM
This law school values diversity and inclusion.  Our commitment is based on three shared principles: First, we believe that the more diverse the law school community is, the more our students will grow intellectually and personally.  Race, gender, age, sexual orientation, religion, disability, and veteran status, for example, are not perfect proxies for the way a person thinks, but in a law school, where so many of the issues we discuss involve questions of social policy, the most meaningful discussions are those among people from different backgrounds who have different...
Posted by Vanessa Rodriguez
04/19/2016 at 10:32 AM
Each semester at RWU Law, two of the school’s great clinical programs schedule classes to bridge the gap between major legal areas. The Immigration Clinic, directed by Deborah Gonzalez, and the Criminal Defense Clinic, directed by Andy Horwitz, come together to learn how the various aspects of these practices areas intertwine. Both clinics are run out of the Providence Downtown Campus and hold classes to learn more about the substantive law surrounding the clinic practice areas. There are some major differences between the areas of Criminal Law and Immigration Law, the most important being...
Posted by Deborah Johnson
04/12/2016 at 02:27 PM
RWU Law is very excited to present the seventh installment in its biennial Thurgood Marshall Memorial Lecture series this week.  This lecture honors the memory and legacy of our nation’s first African American United States Supreme Court Justice. Our featured speaker this year is famed Harvard professor, Dr. Mahzarin Banaji, the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University.  Dr. Banaji has done pioneering work in the area of implicit bias and is one of the architects of the Harvard Implicit Association Test (“IAT”). ...