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Calendar

Thursday, April 14 2016

Time Items
All day
 
4:00 pm
Date
Thu, 04/14/2016 - 4:30pm
Location
RWU Law | Appellate Courtroom 283 | Bristol, RI
Body

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People

RWU Law Keynote Address BLINDSPOT

A Keynote Address by
RWU Law Keynote Address Mahzarin Banaji

Mahzarin Banaji
Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics, Department of Psychology
Harvard University

The School of Law presents its seventh lecture in this series, which honors the memory of Thurgood Marshall.  Thurgood Marshall was a key architect of the legal strategy that convinced the Supreme Court to declare unconstitutional the doctrine of “separate but equal,” which had allowed racial segregation in public education and many other aspects of American life.  Thurgood Marshall later served with distinction and as a protector of civil rights as Solicitor General of the United States and later as the first African-American Justice on the United States Supreme Court.

Mahzarin Banaji taught at Yale for 15 years and is currently the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard.  She is also Harvard College Professor in recognition of her outstanding teaching.

Dr.  Banaji is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Herbert Simon Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has received many awards, among them Yale’s Hixon Prize for teaching excellence, a citation from the President of the American Psychological Association, the Diener Prize for outstanding contributions to social psychology, and named William James Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science for significant lifetime contributions to the basic science of psychology.  In 2014 she received Barnard College’s highest honor, the Medal of Distinction, and in 2015 an honorary degree from Smith College. 

Dr.  Banaji studies unconscious thinking and feeling as they unfold in social context, especially implicit decisions about people’s worth, goodness, and competence. While most human beings take seriously the idea that their behavior ought to be consistent with their stated beliefs and values, research in psychology has challenged that possibility by revealing that our minds operate, much of the time, without conscious awareness. Dr. Banaji’s work has been instrumental in this realization, and she will address the question of how well-intentioned people behave in ways that deviate from their own intentions, and how this state of affairs compromises our decisions in legal, medical, financial, and political contexts. 

You can find a good example of Dr. Banaji talking about her work here, and you can take the Implicit Association Test, which she helped pioneer, here.

Dr. Banaji is the author of the book Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People with Anthony Greenwald, published by Random House.

RSVP by April 11 | Office of Programs & Events | lawevents@rwu.edu

Sponsored by Hinckley Allen

 
Additional Support Provided by Diversity & Inclusion Professionals (DAIP)  

 

 

 

Location
RWU Law | Appellate Courtroom 283 | Bristol, RI
Body

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People

RWU Law Keynote Address BLINDSPOT

A Keynote Address by
RWU Law Keynote Address Mahzarin Banaji

Mahzarin Banaji
Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics, Department of Psychology
Harvard University

The School of Law presents its seventh lecture in this series, which honors the memory of Thurgood Marshall.  Thurgood Marshall was a key architect of the legal strategy that convinced the Supreme Court to declare unconstitutional the doctrine of “separate but equal,” which had allowed racial segregation in public education and many other aspects of American life.  Thurgood Marshall later served with distinction and as a protector of civil rights as Solicitor General of the United States and later as the first African-American Justice on the United States Supreme Court.

Mahzarin Banaji taught at Yale for 15 years and is currently the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard.  She is also Harvard College Professor in recognition of her outstanding teaching.

Dr.  Banaji is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Herbert Simon Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has received many awards, among them Yale’s Hixon Prize for teaching excellence, a citation from the President of the American Psychological Association, the Diener Prize for outstanding contributions to social psychology, and named William James Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science for significant lifetime contributions to the basic science of psychology.  In 2014 she received Barnard College’s highest honor, the Medal of Distinction, and in 2015 an honorary degree from Smith College. 

Dr.  Banaji studies unconscious thinking and feeling as they unfold in social context, especially implicit decisions about people’s worth, goodness, and competence. While most human beings take seriously the idea that their behavior ought to be consistent with their stated beliefs and values, research in psychology has challenged that possibility by revealing that our minds operate, much of the time, without conscious awareness. Dr. Banaji’s work has been instrumental in this realization, and she will address the question of how well-intentioned people behave in ways that deviate from their own intentions, and how this state of affairs compromises our decisions in legal, medical, financial, and political contexts. 

You can find a good example of Dr. Banaji talking about her work here, and you can take the Implicit Association Test, which she helped pioneer, here.

Dr. Banaji is the author of the book Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People with Anthony Greenwald, published by Random House.

RSVP by April 11 | Office of Programs & Events | lawevents@rwu.edu

Sponsored by Hinckley Allen

 
Additional Support Provided by Diversity & Inclusion Professionals (DAIP)  

 

 

 

Add to calendar
Displaying events for: April 10th-16th, 2016

Thurgood Marshall Memorial Lecture

Thursday, April 14, 2016
4:30 pm - 4:30 pm  |  RWU Law | Appellate Courtroom 283 | Bristol, RI

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People

RWU Law Keynote Address BLINDSPOT

A Keynote Address by
RWU Law Keynote Address Mahzarin Banaji

Mahzarin Banaji
Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics, Department of Psychology
Harvard University

The School of Law presents its seventh lecture in this series, which honors the memory of Thurgood Marshall.  Thurgood Marshall was a key architect of the legal strategy that convinced the Supreme Court to declare unconstitutional the doctrine of “separate but equal,” which had allowed racial segregation in public education and many other aspects of American life.  Thurgood Marshall later served with distinction and as a protector of civil rights as Solicitor General of the United States and later as the first African-American Justice on the United States Supreme Court.

Mahzarin Banaji taught at Yale for 15 years and is currently the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard.  She is also Harvard College Professor in recognition of her outstanding teaching.

Dr.  Banaji is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Herbert Simon Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has received many awards, among them Yale’s Hixon Prize for teaching excellence, a citation from the President of the American Psychological Association, the Diener Prize for outstanding contributions to social psychology, and named William James Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science for significant lifetime contributions to the basic science of psychology.  In 2014 she received Barnard College’s highest honor, the Medal of Distinction, and in 2015 an honorary degree from Smith College. 

Dr.  Banaji studies unconscious thinking and feeling as they unfold in social context, especially implicit decisions about people’s worth, goodness, and competence. While most human beings take seriously the idea that their behavior ought to be consistent with their stated beliefs and values, research in psychology has challenged that possibility by revealing that our minds operate, much of the time, without conscious awareness. Dr. Banaji’s work has been instrumental in this realization, and she will address the question of how well-intentioned people behave in ways that deviate from their own intentions, and how this state of affairs compromises our decisions in legal, medical, financial, and political contexts. 

You can find a good example of Dr. Banaji talking about her work here, and you can take the Implicit Association Test, which she helped pioneer, here.

Dr. Banaji is the author of the book Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People with Anthony Greenwald, published by Random House.

RSVP by April 11 | Office of Programs & Events | lawevents@rwu.edu

Sponsored by Hinckley Allen

 
Additional Support Provided by Diversity & Inclusion Professionals (DAIP)  

 

 

 

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