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RWU Law study abroad opportunities are offered in Tianjin, China, Buenos Aries, Argentina and a combined program in Geneva, Switzerland and The Hague, Netherlands.

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Prospective Students

Welcome Prospective Students!

On behalf of the Office of Career Development, we want to thank you for considering Roger Williams University School of Law. Determining which law school is best suited to your individual needs is an extremely important process that may, at times, seem overwhelming.

One critical factor for you to consider when selecting a law school is the quality of the career development office. As a student of RWU Law, you will receive individualized attention from your Office of Career Development. We pride ourselves on developing strong working relationships with our students beginning at orientation and maintaining that rapport with our alumni long after graduation.

From personalized career counseling and resume drafting workshops to on campus interviewing and legal career fairs, our office will offer comprehensive services designed to facilitate your transition from law school to legal practice. We will assist you with all phases of your job search and professional development, and we will be here to help you throughout your entire career.

We invite you to spend time reviewing the other sections of our website to gain a sense of the services that we offer our students and alumni.  If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us and please stop by and see us when you visit our campus!

5 Things to do Before Law School to Jump Start Your Legal Career

1. Consider reading one or all of these books:
The Official Guide to Legal Specialties by Lisa L. Abrams, J.D.
The New What Can You Do with a Law Degree? by Deborah Arron
Guerilla Tactics for Getting the Legal Job of Your Dreams by Kimm Alayne Walton, J.D.
What Law School Doesn't Teach You:But You Really Need to Know by Kimm Alayne Walton, J.D.

2. Talk with as many current law students as you can.
Find out which classes they have taken, which ones they liked and didn’t like, and why.  Ask about the jobs or internships they have had, how they got their job/s, and about their experiences there. 

3. Talk with as many practicing attorneys as you can.
Find out what area of law they practice, how they got into that that area, and what they like about it.  Ask them what they wish they had known before starting law school and entering the legal profession.

4. Consider attending a court hearing or trial in a local court.
This is an opportunity to see litigation first-hand and to think about whether you might enjoy it.  All courts, both state and federal, are open to the public, except for grand jury hearings.  If you are interested in finding out about when trials are in session, contact the clerk of the individual courts. For Rhode Island, please see http://www.courts.ri.gov and for Massachusetts, please see http://www.mass.gov/courts/.

5. Visit www.psjd.org and go to their Resource Center.
If you are thinking about a career in government or at a non-profit/public interest agency, www.psjd.org has some great resources available including information on careers in prosecution or defense, the federal government, international public interest organizations and funding sources for public interest jobs.