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07/19/2016
By Judge Netti Vogel
Later this month, Democrats will meet in Philadelphia to nominate a woman as the party’s candidate for president.  Unrelated to political partisanship, this historic event highlights the...

Fast Facts

RWU Law partners with the Alpert Medical School of Brown Medical School and the Rhode Island Center for Law and Public Policy in the Rhode Island Medical-Legal Partnership for Children.  This unique collaboration offers legal services to low-income families at Hasbro Children’s Hospital.



Federal Practice/Commercial Litigation

Course Number: 
LAW.965
Credits: 
2

This course combines what has traditionally been taught in two separate courses on Pretrial Practice and Trial Advocacy. The idea behind this course is that federal litigation must be viewed holistically, meaning with an understanding and appreciation for the reality that litigation, from the filing of a complaint through trial, is an integrated process that begins with a well-pled complaint, proceeds through discovery, often involves substantive and dispositive motion practice, and ends (if it is not resolved earlier) at trial. The course is a full year long in order to mimic the actual life cycle of a case in federal court. Students will work on an actual case by drafting pleadings, taking/defending depositions, filing and arguing at least one dispositive motion, and ultimately trying the case before a judge and jury. In addition, throughout the year, students will receive lectures, practice exercises, and guest lectures on key aspects of litigation, including complaint drafting, deposition skills, settlement process and strategy, and trial tactics. This course will be taught primarily by a seasoned litigator and a faculty member, both of whom have practiced in federal court. The students will be split into teams and each team with have a lawyer-coach assigned to assist them. Judge William Smith of the U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island will attend a limited number of the class sessions and preside over some courtroom activities, as his schedule permits