Trending@RWULaw

10/17/2014
By Julia Wyman
It has been a busy fall at the Marine Affairs Institute!  In late September, we held our annual “Meet the Bay” trip with our 1Ls.  Save the Bay, a Rhode Island non-profit dedicated to the...

Fast Facts

RWU Law has 27 active student groups, including Maritime Law Society, Association for Public Interest Law and Multicultural Law Students Association, which allow students to get involved in a variety of extracurricular activities and hear from speakers on a multitude of topics.



Spring

Course Number Descriptionsort icon Credits
LAW.631

Administrative Law

This course introduces the growth and development of administrative law and procedure. Topics include constitutionality and delegation of power, discretion, policy, regulatory and adjudicative functions, rules orders, jurisdiction, investigative functions, procedures, due process and judicial review.

3 Credit(s)
LSM.856.AH6

Appellate Practice through the Lens of the Standard of Review

This course, taught be Judge Francis Flaherty will examine appellate practice through the lens of the standard of review. The standard of review is as important a consideration to an appellate court as the substantive law but is often overlooked or misunderstood by attorneys.  Using sample cases, including some where the courts may have strayed, students will learn about the nuances of these various standards ranging from de novo to the “any evidence” test.    Requires Honors enrollment.

1 Credit(s)
LSM.730

Class Actions

When class actions became a feature of the American civil litigation landscape in the 1960’s, few people anticipated how pervasive and powerful they would become. However, as loudly as supporters have applauded the ability of courageous plaintiffs and their innovative attorneys to use class actions to seek redress for social and economic wrongs, critics have just as vocally attacked what they perceive as unaccountable, attorney-driven litigation. This seminar is designed to provide a basic introduction to the fascinating world of class action litigation. Topics to be covered include: the purpose of class actions; class certification; notice and opt-out rights; litigation strategy and settlement. Throughout the course, students will also explore the thorny academic and practical questions raised by class actions.

2 Credit(s)
LAW.737

Conflicts of Law

This course will focus on the problems of choosing the law to be applied to transactions, relationships and occurrences having contacts with more than one of the United States and with this country and a foreign court. Issues of adjudicatory jurisdiction and recognition of foreign judgments will also be examined.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.820

Employment Law

This course will examine government regulation of the relationship of the individual employee and his or her employer. The propriety of regulating particular areas of the employment relationship and the efficacy of alternative regulatory schemes will be recurring themes. Areas of coverage may include employment at-will, wrongful termination, employment discrimination, regulation of compensation, workplace health and safety, unemployment compensation, and pensions.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.722

Family Law

This course examines the underlying social and economic principles of family life, its regulation by government, and constitutional limitations on regulation. Direct laws covering marriage, divorce, and child custody will be examined but also the course will cover those areas of law--property, income maintenance, medical care, schooling and crime--that also have direct impact on families in this society.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.764

Federal Courts

This course will examine the relationship of federal courts to other organs of federal government and to the states, including an analysis of congressional control over jurisdiction; federal review of state court decisions; the relationship between state and federal substantive and procedural law; the scope of federal questions and diversity of citizenship jurisdiction in federal courts; abstention; federal injunctions of state criminal proceedings; and problems of justiciability and mootness.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.647

Federal Income Tax

This course provides a survey of the federal income tax system as it relates to individual and business activity. Topics include code, regulation, and case analysis; tax policy, economics, and public finance; and tax legislation. Specific concepts included are income, exclusions, deductions, credits, tax accounting, and tax procedure.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.965

Federal Practice/Commercial Litigation

This course combines what has traditionally been taught in two separate courses on Pretrial Practice and Trial Advocacy. The idea behind this course is that federal litigation must be viewed holistically, meaning with an understanding and appreciation for the reality that litigation, from the filing of a complaint through trial, is an integrated process that begins with a well-pled complaint, proceeds through discovery, often involves substantive and dispositive motion practice, and ends (if it is not resolved earlier) at trial. The course is a full year long in order to mimic the actual life cycle of a case in federal court. Students will work on an actual case by drafting pleadings, taking/defending depositions, filing and arguing at least one dispositive motion, and ultimately trying the case before a judge and jury. In addition, throughout the year, students will receive lectures, practice exercises, and guest lectures on key aspects of litigation, including complaint drafting, deposition skills, settlement process and strategy, and trial tactics. This course will be taught primarily by a seasoned litigator and a faculty member, both of whom have practiced in federal court. The students will be split into teams and each team with have a lawyer-coach assigned to assist them. Judge William Smith of the U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island will attend a limited number of the class sessions and preside over some courtroom activities, as his schedule permits

2 Credit(s)
LAW.789

Fisheries Law & Policy

This course will examine the law and policies of federal, state, and international regulations of fishing, with the primary focus on federal regulation under the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Act. The course will examine the science of fisheries stocks and various approaches that have been tried or proposed for managing and conserving fisheries. The course will also examine the administrative law framework governing fisheries. Among the issues the course will examine are the competing policies at issue in managing fisheries and the ways that law seeks to address the competing interests in exploitation and conservation, commercial and recreational fishing, national and international interests, and the selection of local, national, and international control.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.728

Human Rights

This course introduces students to the global human rights regime. It employs a variety of perspectives--including historical, political, theoretical, and legal--in order to cultivate a broad understanding of human rights. Core human rights treaties will be examined, as will mechanisms for monitoring and enforcement. General issues recurring in the course are: the enduring divide between human rights theory and practice; the changing dimensions of state sovereignty; the potential for international law to bring about a “good society” and its substantive vision for the same; and the ability of the human rights regime to influence the course of both international relations and domestic politics.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.870

Immigration Clinic

The Immigration Clinic is a one semester program in which students represent noncitizens in removal proceedings in immigration court and applications for immigration benefits. Students represent clients in their applications for asylum, visas for victims of violent crime, benefits for noncitizen victims of domestic violence, waivers for long-term permanent residents and visas for juvenile victims of abuse, abandonment or neglect. Students also conduct “Know Your Rights” presentations for immigration detainees and similar presentations for immigrant communities in Rhode Island.

8 Credit(s)
LAW.792

International Business Transactions

This course is designed to introduce students to the issues involved in private trading in international markets. Consideration of transnational economic activity will cover the role of lawyers, the legal and financial framework, and national and international policies that limit and control such trading.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.770

International Law

This basic course introduces students to the central topics, ideas and principles of present-day public international law. It will also cover the judicial and other structures including the United Nations, that are central to the determination and enforcement of this legal regime.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.796

Judicial Clerkship Internship Program

Students are assigned to selected judges in Rhode Island and federal trial and appellate courts. The student interns conduct legal research, prepare memoranda of law, observe trial and appellate proceedings, participate in discussions with the court, and perform the duties of a judicial law clerk under the supervision of the assigned judge and a faculty
member. The program requires the devotion of substantial amounts of time both in and out of the judge's chambers and must be taken in conjunction with Seminar: Judicial Process and Ethics.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.743

Land Use Planning

This course focuses on the public regulation of land and its use. Various planning theories will be reviewed in the course of studying the law of zoning, subdivision control, eminent domain, and renewal of urban and rural areas. There may also be coverage of environmental impacts on land use.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.726

Law and Medicine

The two professions of law and medicine intersect in many parts of American society. Issues such as expert testimony, the doctor-patient relationship, malpractice, and ethical issues, including the right to die, and their legal ramifications will be reviewed.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.787

Marine Insurance

This course examines the legal problems involved in insurance against physical loss or damage to maritime property (hull), against maritime liabilities (protection and indemnity), and for damage to goods (cargo).

2 Credit(s)
LAW.793

Marine Pollution

This course will cover the major United States laws imposing liability for pollution of inland and costal waters and the high seas, including CERCLA, the Clean Water Act, and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Special attention will be given to the relation between these laws and the general maritime law of the United States; problems of federalism and uniformity; comparison of the United States law with international conventions; and administrative decision making. Some prior knowledge of United States admiralty practice and administrative law would be helpful.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.782

Maritime Practice & Procedure

This course examines the procedural aspects of maritime practice. It focuses on the jurisdictional and legal basis of actions in rem, quasi in rem, and in personam. Special emphasis is on the Supplemental Rules for Certain Admiralty and Maritime Claims.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.733

Mediation

When parties are unable to resolve their dispute through discussion or negotiation, a logical next step is to seek the assistance of a third party mediator to facilitate communication and the search for a solution. This workshop course is intended to familiarize students with the norms of the mediation process and to develop the lawyering skills that will enable students to either serve as mediators or to better represent clients in this increasingly important form of ADR. Attention is given to both facilitative and evaluative styles of mediation. Significant emphasis is placed on role playing exercises and on the legal consequences of the mediation process.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.711

Mental Health Law: A Multidisciplinary Approch

This course is designed to create a cross disciplinary environment where students can explore some of the critical issues that cross the boundaries between law and behavioral health. It will focus on selected topics, exploring each of them from a medical as well as legal perspective. The course will begin with an overview of the mental health system and its history, as well as an outline of the specialized legal environment in which it works. There will then be a series of focus sessions that zoom in on specific issues. There will be three skills workshops providing practical application of the material to common types of psychiatric hearings: civil certification; dangerousness; and competency/diversion. Brown University graduate students in psychiatry and psychology will be registered students in this course.

2 Credit(s)
LAW.809

Mergers & Acquisitions

The course will explore corporate acquisitions, including mergers and consolidations, in the form of asset sale, stock sale, or statutory merger. The consequences of these transactions will be discussed, including, potentially, successor liability, securities regulations, antitrust, tax, accounting, environmental, intellectual property, ERISA, and other legal issues. Due diligence review, negotiation, and documentation will also be discussed. Business Organizations is a prerequisite.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.673

Natural Resources Law

This course will focus on the regulation of natural resources and will cover common law and statutory implications to wildlife regulation, water and air pollution efforts, water law, land use controls, mining and mineral law. Issues related to conserving recreational resources and historical artefacts and landmarks will also be explored.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.651

Payment Systems

This course covers Articles 3 and 4 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It surveys the legal concept of money, negotiability, usury laws, commercial paper and bank credit as a money substitute, doctrines of holder in due course, liability and discharge and paper/electronic transfers. Consideration is given also to letters of credit and documents of title.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.738

Remedies

The remedies course surveys what a court can do for a claimant who has been, or might be, wronged by the defendant. We will address the principal remedies: damages; injunctions (orders to do or refrain from doing certain conduct); restitution (including the possibility of recovering the defendant's gains from a wrongful act, even if those gains exceed the amount of the plaintiff's loss); remedies that simply declare the rights of the parties; pre-judgment remedies before a determination of liability; and the various means of enforcing remedies (including contempt and seizure of property). Throughout the course, we will discuss which of the several remedies are best for the plaintiff, and how to determine the extent of the remedy that the plaintiff may obtain.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.810

Residential Real Estate Transactions

This course is designed to introduce students to the complexities of land development and redevelopment, the financing of these transactions, and the tax planning required. It will also more lightly note the environmental and land use issues in these areas. Various documents will be prepared by the students during the course. Several classes will focus on negotiation and mediation strategies as issues arise among the various parties to these transactions.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.653

Secured Transactions

This course surveys Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and focuses on financing and creation of a secured interest in personal property and fixtures.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.832

Securities Regulation

This course covers two of the most active and critical legislative acts adopted in the field of economic regulation, the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. It discusses the disclosure and other provisions imposed on companies issuing and dealing in stock and other securities, as well as remedies available. Ethical issues facing lawyers servicing clients in this area are also examined. Business Organization is a prerequisite.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.749

Wills & Trusts

This course is intended to prepare a student to advise clients about ordering their personal and financial affairs to more effectively provide for themselves and the people about whom they care. Various dispositive mechanisms, inter vivos testamentary and in trust, will be covered, as well as devices to appoint health care and financial proxies. The course will also address the ethical and professional responsibilities of lawyers representing clients in this area.

3 Credit(s)