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06/24/2015
By Diana Hassel
Plans are well underway for the RWU School of Law’s expanded presence in downtown Providence.    The four-story building at One Empire Street will be devoted almost exclusively to...

Fast Facts

Each year the Rhode Island Supreme Court presides over the final round of our Esther Clark Moot Court Competition giving the finalists a once-in-a-lifetime experience.



Course Descriptions - %1

Course Number Descriptionsort icon Credits
LAW.641

Trial Advocacy

The trial advocacy course employs a learning-by-doing approach. Thus, most of the course will involve the practice of trial skills including direct and cross examination, opening statements, closing arguments, and jury selection, in a simulated courtroom environment. During the last two weeks of the course, each student will participate as co-counsel in a full-length simulated civil or criminal trial with a sitting Rhode Island judge or professor presiding.

2 Credit(s)
LSM.856.AH6

U.S. Supreme Court Cases

This class will focus on the art of appellate advocacy with particular focus on two cases that will be argued this spring before the United States Supreme Court.  The class will include a trip to the Court to hear those two cases argued and for a meeting with Justice Alito.

1 Credit(s)
LAW.749

Wills & Trusts

This course is intended to prepare a student to advise clients about ordering their personal and financial affairs to more effectively provide for themselves and the people about whom they care. Various dispositive mechanisms, inter vivos testamentary and in trust, will be covered, as well as devices to appoint health care and financial proxies. The course will also address the ethical and professional responsibilities of lawyers representing clients in this area.

3 Credit(s)
LAW 703

Workers Comp

This course will consider and evaluate benefit delivery systems for those who suffer work related injuries.  Class discussion will trace the evolution of the law from common law tort system and the use of the affirmative defenses to bar most claims to the development of benefit systems which do not utilize fault as a liability measure.  The structure of the benefit system will be evaluated and distinctions considered between the various state systems as well as the federal longshore and harbor workers compensation act.

 

2 Credit(s)