Trending@RWULaw

11/17/2014
By Dean Michael J. Yelnosky
As the shortest day of the year approaches, it can be uplifting to recall the long, bright days of summer. Just months ago, across practice settings and across the country, many of our students used...

Fast Facts

RWU Law had a 90% pass rate for the July 2012 Connecticut bar exam for all first time test takers, 7% higher than the state average.



Course Descriptions - %1

Course Number Descriptionsort icon Credits
LAW.965

Federal Practice/Commercial Litigation

This course combines what has traditionally been taught in two separate courses on Pretrial Practice and Trial Advocacy. The idea behind this course is that federal litigation must be viewed holistically, meaning with an understanding and appreciation for the reality that litigation, from the filing of a complaint through trial, is an integrated process that begins with a well-pled complaint, proceeds through discovery, often involves substantive and dispositive motion practice, and ends (if it is not resolved earlier) at trial. The course is a full year long in order to mimic the actual life cycle of a case in federal court. Students will work on an actual case by drafting pleadings, taking/defending depositions, filing and arguing at least one dispositive motion, and ultimately trying the case before a judge and jury. In addition, throughout the year, students will receive lectures, practice exercises, and guest lectures on key aspects of litigation, including complaint drafting, deposition skills, settlement process and strategy, and trial tactics. This course will be taught primarily by a seasoned litigator and a faculty member, both of whom have practiced in federal court. The students will be split into teams and each team with have a lawyer-coach assigned to assist them. Judge William Smith of the U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island will attend a limited number of the class sessions and preside over some courtroom activities, as his schedule permits

2 Credit(s)
LAW.789

Fisheries Law & Policy

This course will examine the law and policies of federal, state, and international regulations of fishing, with the primary focus on federal regulation under the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Act. The course will examine the science of fisheries stocks and various approaches that have been tried or proposed for managing and conserving fisheries. The course will also examine the administrative law framework governing fisheries. Among the issues the course will examine are the competing policies at issue in managing fisheries and the ways that law seeks to address the competing interests in exploitation and conservation, commercial and recreational fishing, national and international interests, and the selection of local, national, and international control.

3 Credit(s)
LSM.856.A3

Genocide and Atrocity Crimes

Genocide in the 20th Century: In this course, which meets on Friday and Saturday on two separate weeks, Professor Noone explores the phenomenon of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and the legal instruments available to identify and punish atrocity crimes.

 

1 Credit(s)
LAW.720

Health Law and Policy

This course will provide an overview of the complex laws, regulations and underlying policies that govern health care delivery. Issues to be examined include access to medical care; Medicare and Medicaid; health insurance and payment systems; informed consent; confidentiality; and end¬of¬life decision making.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.811

Housing Law & Policy

This course considers the law and policy of fair housing and of housing and urban development in the United States. There will be a focus on anti¬discrimination laws in housing and on legal mechanisms and government programs designed to improve the access of lower¬income people to housing opportunities.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.728

Human Rights

This course introduces students to the global human rights regime. It employs a variety of perspectives--including historical, political, theoretical, and legal--in order to cultivate a broad understanding of human rights. Core human rights treaties will be examined, as will mechanisms for monitoring and enforcement. General issues recurring in the course are: the enduring divide between human rights theory and practice; the changing dimensions of state sovereignty; the potential for international law to bring about a “good society” and its substantive vision for the same; and the ability of the human rights regime to influence the course of both international relations and domestic politics.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.870

Immigration Clinic

The Immigration Clinic is a one semester program in which students represent noncitizens in removal proceedings in immigration court and applications for immigration benefits. Students represent clients in their applications for asylum, visas for victims of violent crime, benefits for noncitizen victims of domestic violence, waivers for long-term permanent residents and visas for juvenile victims of abuse, abandonment or neglect. Students also conduct “Know Your Rights” presentations for immigration detainees and similar presentations for immigrant communities in Rhode Island.

8 Credit(s)
LAW.772

Immigration Law

This seminar will focus on legal responses to immigration over history, as well as present and suggested legislation, enforcement and informal policies. The federal¬state division of jurisdiction will be examined, as well as suggestions for future action.

3 Credit(s)
LAW.788

Insurance Law

 This course will focus on the types of insurance most likely to be encountered in private practice -- property and casualty (liability) insurance. Topics covered will include the theory and basic concepts of insurance; the insurance contract and principles of interpretation; application, underwriting, and risk analysis concepts; insurance contract formation and carrier issues/responses; types and structure of typical property and casualty policies to include policy declarations, definitions of insureds, insuring clauses, coverages, exclusions, and limitations; duties imposed on insurance carriers and insureds; typical policy conditions and application; statutory requirements and policies; first and third party claim handling processes; duty to defend and duty to indemnify; fair claim handling practice requirements and extra-contractual liability; insurance fraud issues, and; insurance regulation.

2 Credit(s)
LAW.740

Intellectual Property

The rights and obligations of those who possess and use property in the form of patents, copyrights, trademarks and other areas of ideas and invention are the subject matter of this course. International as well as federal and state controls and policies will be studied.

3 Credit(s)