Faculty News

  • AE extended
    Affordable Excellence Extended to 2016-17
    With notable increases in enrollment, the Affordable Excellence tuition reduction and guarantee will continue for a third incoming class at RWU Law.
  • drone
    Logan on Drone Law
    The proliferation of drones presents a range of novel liability questions that lawyers and judges haven’t had to grapple with since the advent of the automobile.
  • Veterans Clinic
    Law Clinic for Disabled Veterans
    An important new clinical initiative offers renewed hope to military veterans whose disability benefits have been denied and can’t afford to appeal.

David A. Logan

David A. Logan
Professor of Law

J.D., University of Virginia
M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison
B.A., Bucknell University


David Logan served as Dean at Roger Williams School of Law from 2003 to 2014, making him one of the nation's longest-serving law deans. In 2014, he returned to full-time teaching and research.

A graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, Professor Logan clerked for a federal judge and practiced with a major Washington, D.C., law firm, representing Native American tribes. He was a faculty member at Wake Forest University School of Law from 1981 to 2003, where he won awards for his teaching of Torts, Media Law, and Professional Responsibility. His publications, focusing on the intersection of Tort law and the First Amendment, have appeared in major journals, including the Michigan Law Review and the Virginia Law Review. He has been a visiting professor at a number of law schools, most recently, Florida State College of Law.

In 2009, Rhode Island Legal Services (RILS) recognized Logan for his “dedication and commitment to equal justice in the law.” He was also honored by the NAACP for his outstanding efforts toward achieving diversity and inclusiveness in legal education. And in January 2010 he received the American Association of Law School’s Deborah L. Rhode Award for making “an outstanding contribution to increasing pro bono and public service opportunities in law school through scholarship, leadership, or service.” 

Professor Logan is a frequent commentator on legal issues, having appeared on television (Fox News, NBC Evening News, CBS Morning News, the O’Reilly Factor and Nightline), radio (BBC Radio, Voice of Russia, Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Marketplace) and many print media outlets (including Time, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Washington Post).

He was born in New York City and grew up in the Washington, D.C. area. He earned his BA from Bucknell, his MA from Wisconsin-Madison and his JD from Virginia.  In college, he was a varsity basketball player, head deejay on the campus radio station, and a music critic for Rolling Stone.

Selected Publications


"Protection of Personality Rights against Invasions by the Mass Media in the United States of America,” in The Protection of Personality Rights Against Invasions by the Mass Media, edited by Helmut Kozel & Alexander Warzilek (Vienna: Springer, 2005) (with Michael D. Green)

North Carolina Torts, 2d ed. (Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press, 2004) (with Wayne A. Logan)


Juries, Judges, and the Politics of Tort Reform, 83 University of Cincinnati Law Review 903 (2015)

When the Restatement is Not a Restatement: The Curious Case of the Flagrant Trespasser, 37 William Mitchell Law Review 1448 (2011) (symposium on the Restatement (3d) Torts)

The Perils of Glastnost, 38 University of Toledo Law Review 565 (2007)

Teaching Through Tragedy, 34 Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law 181 (2002)

Libel Law in the Trenches: Reflections on Current Data on Libel Litigation, 86 Virginia Law Review 503 (2001)

All Monica, All of the Time, The 24-Hour News Cycle and the Proof of Culpability in Libel Actions, 23 University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review 201 (2000)

Upping the Ante: Curricular and Bar Exam Reform in Professional Responsibility, 56 Washington and Lee Law Review 1023 (1999)

Masked Media: Judges, Juries, and the Law of Surreptitious Newsgathering, 83 Iowa Law Review 161 (1997)

Of "Sloppy Journalism","Corporate Tyranny", and " Mea Culpas": The Curious Case of Moldea v. New York Times, 37 William and Mary Law Review 161 (1995)