Faculty News

  • AE extended
    Affordable Excellence Extended to 2016-17
    With notable increases in enrollment, the Affordable Excellence tuition reduction and guarantee will continue for a third incoming class at RWU Law.
  • drone
    Logan on Drone Law
    The proliferation of drones presents a range of novel liability questions that lawyers and judges haven’t had to grapple with since the advent of the automobile.
  • Veterans Clinic
    Law Clinic for Disabled Veterans
    An important new clinical initiative offers renewed hope to military veterans whose disability benefits have been denied and can’t afford to appeal.

Niki Kuckes

Niki Kuckes
Professor of Law &
Assistant Dean for Strategic Planning

J.D., Yale
B.A., Cornell University


After a successful term at Yale Law School (where she served on the Yale Law Journal, the Yale Journal of Law and Policy, and the Yale Journal of International Law), Niki Kuckes won a coveted clerkship with Judge (now Justice) Antonin Scalia. She moved on to develop a sophisticated litigation practice in Washington, D.C, where for almost two decades she focused on white collar criminal matters, copyright and First Amendment, and legal malpractice cases. Professor Kuckes has used this expertise to develop a strong reputation in the areas of grand juries and prosecutorial ethics. Before coming to RWU, Professor Kuckes was "Distinguished Practitioner in Residence" at Cornell Law School.

Professor Kuckes was awarded tenure and promoted to Full Professor in 2009, and she brings her deep practice experience to her teaching of Civil Procedure, Intellectual Property, and Professional Responsibility.

Selected Publications


The State of Rule 3.8: Prosecutorial Ethics Reform Since Ethics 2000, 22 Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics 427 (2009)

Civil Due Process, Criminal Due Process, 25 Yale Law and Policy Review 1 (2006)

The Democratic Prosecutor: Explaining the Constitutional Function of the Federal Grand Jury, 94 Georgetown Law Journal 1265 (2006)

The Useful, Dangerous Fiction of Grand Jury Independence¸ 41 American Criminal Law Review 1 (2004)