Faculty News

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    The Legal Impact of Marine Debris
    Senator Whitehouse, other national and local experts confront a growing threat to New England’s tourism, ecological health and fisheries industry
  • Deborah Johnson
    Johnson Wins 2nd Term as MBWA President
    Deborah Johnson, RWU Law's Director of Diversity and Outreach, has been re-elected president of the Massachusetts Black Women Attorneys association.
  • TIME: Bogus on Second Amendment
    Time asks: does the "right to bear arms" apply equally to all citizens – or just whites? While the question has recently made headlines, it's as old as the country itself.

Niki Kuckes

Niki Kuckes
Professor of Law

J.D., Yale
B.A., Cornell University


After a successful term at Yale Law School (where she served on the Yale Law Journal, the Yale Journal of Law and Policy, and the Yale Journal of International Law), Niki Kuckes won a coveted clerkship with Judge (now Justice) Antonin Scalia. She moved on to develop a sophisticated litigation practice in Washington, D.C, where for almost two decades she focused on white collar criminal matters, copyright and First Amendment, and legal malpractice cases. Professor Kuckes has used this expertise to develop a strong reputation in the areas of grand juries and prosecutorial ethics. Before coming to RWU, Professor Kuckes was "Distinguished Practitioner in Residence" at Cornell Law School.

Professor Kuckes was awarded tenure and promoted to Full Professor in 2009, and she brings her deep practice experience to her teaching of Civil Procedure, Intellectual Property, and Professional Responsibility.

Selected Publications


The State of Rule 3.8: Prosecutorial Ethics Reform Since Ethics 2000, 22 Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics 427 (2009)

Civil Due Process, Criminal Due Process, 25 Yale Law and Policy Review 1 (2006)

The Democratic Prosecutor: Explaining the Constitutional Function of the Federal Grand Jury, 94 Georgetown Law Journal 1265 (2006)

The Useful, Dangerous Fiction of Grand Jury Independence¸ 41 American Criminal Law Review 1 (2004)