Adjunct Professor David Coombs told law students and faculty about his defense strategy and his hope that the military will allow Manning hormone therapy.

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AP: Coombs on Wikileaks Trial

Adjunct Professor David Coombs told law students and faculty about his defense strategy and his hope that the military will allow Manning hormone therapy.

From THE GUARDIAN (UK): "Chelsea Manning awaits diagnosis in prison before possible hormone therapy" by Michelle R. Smith and David Dishneau, Associated Press

 

David Coombs at RWU LawBRISTOL, R.I., Sept. 25, 2013: The lawyer who defended Chelsea Manning against charges of leaking classified information said Wednesday that his client is being assessed at a military prison for gender identity disorder, and that he's hopeful the military will allow Manning to receive hormone therapy.

Civilian attorney David Coombs spoke to more than 150 students and faculty at Roger Williams University School of Law, where he has taught. Manning, previously known as Bradley, is serving a 35-year sentence for a July conviction on espionage and other offenses for sending more than 700,000 documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. [...]

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