Professor Carl Bogus speaks to the Providence Journal about why the George Zimmerman verdict was the only possible outcome, in light of the evidence.

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Bogus on Zimmerman Acquittal

Professor Carl Bogus speaks to the Providence Journal about why the George Zimmerman verdict was the only possible outcome, in light of the evidence.

From the PROVIDENCE JOURNAL: In Providence, marchers denounce verdict in Trayvon Martin’s killing,” by Philip Marcelo, Journal Staff Writer

Professor Carl BogusPROVIDENCE, July 15, 2013 — The day after George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Florida, more than 150 residents and activists rallied and marched through Providence’s South Side in protest Sunday evening. […]

But Carl T. ‍Bogus, a law professor at Roger Williams University in Bristol, said the outcome was the only possible one, in light of the evidence.

The Florida prosecutors, he said, simply failed to prove Zimmerman’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

“The available evidence didn’t meet that standard. In fact, it wasn’t even close,” he said via e-mail. “Do I think that George Zimmerman was probably responsible for an innocent boy’s death? I do. Yet, had I been on the jury, I would have had to vote to acquit.” [...]

For full story, click here.