Dean Designate Michael J. Yelnosky on the shifting landscape of legal education and legal practice, and how RWU Law is rising to meet the challenge.

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07/16/2014
When I left Wake Forest for the deanship at Roger Williams in 2003, I signed a contract for 3 years, hoped to survive for 5 (the typical deanship lasts 4+ years, about the same as NFL coaches), and...


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The Changing Face of Legal Education

Dean Designate Michael J. Yelnosky on the shifting landscape of legal education and legal practice, and how RWU Law is rising to meet the challenge.

From the NEWPORT MERCURY: "Law and Attraction" by Antonia N. Farzan

Dean Designate Michael J. YelnoskyMichael J. Yelnosky, 53 | Dean designate

It’s a challenging time to be a law school dean. Enrollment is dropping, and graduates are no longer guaranteed a high-paying job after they pass the bar. But the number of applications to Roger Williams Law School has increased, thanks in part to the fact that the law school is lowering its tuition for the 2014-2015 academic year. On July 1, Michael J. Yelnosky will become dean of Rhode Island’s only law school, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. He’s been on the faculty for all 20 years and believes that a legal education is still practical and useful, even if you don’t plan to practice law. 

How are today’s students different than the students of 20 years ago?

I think this particular cohort of students is much more entrepreneurial than my cohort was. In my day, and certainly in the generation before mine, people expected to go to work for a company for an extended period of time. [...]

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