The Providence Journal reports on a special event at RWU Law, with judges, lawyers, professors and students discussing the "Lawyers Without Rights" exhibit.

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Discussing Lawyers During Holocaust

The Providence Journal reports on a special event at RWU Law, with judges, lawyers, professors and students discussing the "Lawyers Without Rights" exhibit.

From the Providence Journal: Exhibit in Bristol and Providence examines fate of Jewish lawyers in Nazi Germany” by Katie Mulvaney, Journal Staff Writer

Eric B. Hogberg, a lawyer in Boston, reads about the horrific treatment of Jewish lawyers by the Nazis during the pre-World War II era and during the war. The exhibit, titled "Lawyers Without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich," is on display at the Roger Williams School of Law, in Bristol, on Monday and moves to the federal courthouse in Providence on Sept. 8. The Providence Journal/Bob ThayerBRISTOL, R.I., Aug. 29, 2015 — When Adolf Hitler assumed power in Germany in 1933, one of the first segments of society he took aim at were those trained as defenders of rights and justice — lawyers.

[…]   An exhibition now on display at Roger Williams School of Law — "Lawyers without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich" — explores the journey of several prominent Jewish lawyers during this period. It also contemplates why their non-Jewish colleagues silently stood by as their colleagues were robbed of their rights and brutalized.

[…] The display, which consists of panels of photos and images of documents interspersed with text, is a joint venture of the German Federal Bar, or Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer, in cooperation with the American Bar Association. It can be viewed at the law school on Monday and at the federal courthouse off Kennedy Plaza in Providence from Sept. 8 to Oct. 2.

[…] panels tell of lawyers fleeing to America, where they took jobs as chauffeurs, busboys and dishwashers. Some eventually earned law degrees in the United States and returned to practice. Others would never practice again.

Such [was] the case for Roger Williams School of Law Prof. David A. Logan's father, Ladislav Loewenbein. Logan relayed his father's tale Wednesday at a talk at the law school exploring the exhibit. […]

The exhibit, Logan said, proves why the rule of law matters.

That sentiment was echoed by the discussion's featured speaker, Richard Weisberg, a professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, in New York City.

[…] "The only thing worse than lawyers is no lawyers," said Roger Williams law school Dean Michael Yelnosky. It is their role to challenge and question, he said.

U.S. District Court Judge William E. Smith agreed [...] “This exhibit reminds us of the vulnerability of the rule of law in the face of oppression and terror, and that we all share in the responsibility to defend our cherished system,” he said. […]

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