Professor Jared Goldstein joined a panel discussing whether Rhode Island should convene a state constitutional convention and which areas should be amended.

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Goldstein on RI Constitutional Convention

Professor Jared Goldstein joined a panel discussing whether Rhode Island should convene a state constitutional convention and which areas should be amended.

From the PROVIDENCE JOURNAL: "Three R.I. experts debate value of a constitutional convention" by Linda Borg, Journal Staff Writer

RI Constitutional ConventionSMITHFIELD, R.I., March 29, 2014 — [...] At Bryant University on Saturday, local experts discussed whether Rhode Island should convene a convention, and, if so, what areas of the state Constitution should be amended.

The forum was sponsored by the Hassenfeld Institute for Public Leadership at Bryant, the Roger Williams University School of Law, Common Cause Rhode Island and the R.I. League of Women Voters. [RWU Law Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Diana Hassel moderated.]

Three local experts, Robert Flanders Jr., former associate justice of the state Supreme Court; Steven Brown, executive director of the Rhode Island affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union; and Jared Goldstein, a professor of law at RWU; debated the pros and cons of a Constitutional Convention before about 100 participants. [...]

Professor Jared GoldsteinGoldstein staked out the middle ground, saying he “mildly supported” a Constitutional Convention. Certain issues, such as ethics reform and judicial selection, rise to the level of a Constitutional Convention. Others, such as abandoning high-stakes testing as a high school graduation requirement, do not.

But a convention faces substantial obstacles, Goldstein said.

“Most voters will know very little about the issues,” he said. “In order to be successful, there must be a campaign to inform the voters.” [...]

For full story, click here.