Professor Andrew Horwitz recently took part in a multidisciplinary panel of leading experts on the question of whether marijuana should be legalized.

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Horwitz on Marijuana Legalization

Professor Andrew Horwitz recently took part in a multidisciplinary panel of leading experts on the question of whether marijuana should be legalized.

From Wallethub:Should Marijuana Be Legal?” by John S Kiernan

Marijuana LegalizationJuly 15, 2016: Call it a sign of society’s moral erosion, an act of economic desperation or folks finally coming to their senses, but a record-high number of Americans – 61% – now support marijuana legalization […] Not everyone is ready to climb aboard Puff the Magic Dragon just yet, however. […]

With that in mind and much of the pot problem still unsolved, we turned to a panel of 26 leading experts in the fields of economics, public policy, law enforcement and healthcare for additional insights. We asked them one simple question: Should marijuana be legal? [...]

  • Professor Andrew HorwitzAndrew Horwitz, Professor of Law and Assistant Dean for Experiential Education, Roger Williams University School of Law

“If marijuana were legalized and regulated, thus treating it the same way we treat alcohol in this country, a number of positive developments should be expected to follow. First, we would put an end to the extraordinarily discriminatory fashion in which we have enforced our marijuana laws, which has done extensive damage to communities of color. Second, we could begin to treat addiction as a health problem, which is what it is. Third, we could begin to educate our children more honestly and, therefore, more effectively, as we do about alcohol and cigarettes. I believe that legalization will come to pass but, like any movement that requires a change in thinking (such as same-sex marriage), it will take some time.”

For full story, click here.