Nebraska native Marcus Swift '14 says working class people who need access to the legal system -- whether in the Northeast or the Midwest -- often can't afford it.

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Marcus Swift '14 on Public Service

Nebraska native Marcus Swift '14 says working class people who need access to the legal system -- whether in the Northeast or the Midwest -- often can't afford it.

From the FALL RIVER HERALD NEWS: "Law student intern helps those in need" by Michael Gagne, Herald News Staff Reporter

Marcus Swift '14FALL RIVER, Mass., Aug 19, 2013: It goes without saying, northeast Nebraska is a little bit different a setting than southeastern Massachusetts. The geographic differences are obvious. Then there’s the population, and the traffic. There are more people and cars out here.

But for Nebraska native Marcus Swift — a Roger Williams University student going into his final year of law school — under the surface, the places are not all that different. The make-up of his hometown and Fall River are alike — majority working class people. At some point, those folks may need access to the legal system, and may not be able to afford it.

“Many people are one layoff or one medical problem away from catastrophe,” said Swift, who is in his late 20s. “I’ve decided to commit to fighting for the working class.” [...]

For full story, click here.