The Boston Globe tracks '14 alum Antonio Viana's inspiring personal journey from undocumented immigrant to immigration lawyer.

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11/14/2017
By David Coombs
[RWU Law Professor, veteran and military law expert David Coombs offered the following remarks during Veterans Day observances at Roger Williams University on November 10. The address has been...


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From Undocumented to Immigration Lawyer

The Boston Globe tracks '14 alum Antonio Viana's inspiring personal journey from undocumented immigrant to immigration lawyer.

From The Boston Globe: "He couldn't get a visa and he couldn't get deported.  So he went to law school instead." by Maria Sacchetti

Antonio Massa Viana was a star law student at Roger Williams University. He edited the law review and triumphed in the moot court competition. The Supreme Court chief justice knew his name.
He was also in the United States illegally, diving headlong into a profession where the laws were literally stacked against him. Except in Massachusetts, where in 2014 Viana became the first known unauthorized immigrant to earn a law license.
“A lot of people told me ‘you’re never going to be able to go to law school’ because of my status,” Viana, a 39-year-old from Brazil, said in one of a series of interviews in recent months. “It hasn’t been easy at all, but here I am.”

July 26, 2016: Antonio Massa Viana was a star law student at Roger Williams University. He edited the law review and triumphed in the moot court competition. The Supreme Court chief justice knew his name.

He was also in the United States illegally, diving headlong into a profession where the laws were literally stacked against him. Except in Massachusetts, where in 2014 Viana became the first known unauthorized immigrant to earn a law license.

“A lot of people told me ‘you’re never going to be able to go to law school’ because of my status,” Viana, a 39-year-old from Brazil, said in one of a series of interviews in recent months. “It hasn’t been easy at all, but here I am.”

For the full Boston Globe article click here.