Professor Michael Yelnosky speaks with WRNI political analyst Scott MacKay about the shortcomings of Rhode Island's judicial selection process.

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07/10/2017
By Dean Michael J. Yelnosky
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Yelnosky on Judicial Selection

Professor Michael Yelnosky speaks with WRNI political analyst Scott MacKay about the shortcomings of Rhode Island's judicial selection process.

FROM WRNI, Rhode Island's NPR: "Rhode Island Courts: The Insider Lollapalozza" by Scott MacKay   

Professor Michael YelnoskyMay 24, 2013: After the Rhode Island court scandals of the 1990s, the state changed the way judges are chosen. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay explains why lawyers with Statehouse connections keep getting appointed to the bench despite the reforms. [...]

This insider Lollapalozza keeps qualified lawyers from even applying to be judges, says Michael Yelnosky, Roger Williams University law professor. When a lawyer applies to be a judge, his or her name becomes public, signaling to clients that he or she no longer wants to represent them. Why, asks Yelnosky, would a successful lawyer want to submit to public scrutiny knowing the system is rigged for a State House crony?

Isn’t it about time to plug the lobbyist loophole, shut the magistrate back door, and bring some fresh blood into the Rhode Island judiciary, which is supposed to be a separate and equal branch of government, not a subsidiary of the Statehouse.

For full story, click here.