Professor David Zlotnick appears in the Huffington Post, discussing what prosecuors may want from inlaws of the slain Boston Marathon bomber.

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Zlotnick on Tsarnaev Inlaws Grand Jury

Professor David Zlotnick appears in the Huffington Post, discussing what prosecuors may want from inlaws of the slain Boston Marathon bomber.

From the ASSOCIATED PRESS:Tamerlan Tsarnaev's In-laws Testify At Grand Jury” by Denise Lavoie and Michelle R. Smith

BOSTON, Sept. 12, 3013 — The in-laws of slain Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev testified Thursday before a federal grand jury investigating the deadly April 15 attack. […]

Professor David ZlotnickDavid Zlotnick, a professor at Roger Williams University School of Law and a former federal prosecutor, said the only reasons to keep a grand jury investigation going are if prosecutors believe there are still people who might need to be charged or that there could be additional charges for those already under indictment.

"I'm amazed this is still going on. One bomber's dead. The other one they have lock-solid proof of his guilt," he said.

Zlotnick said momentum might be the cause of the continuing investigation.

"Once the federal law enforcement system gears up and devotes resources, sometimes it has a life of its own. When do you stop?" he said. "They were told, get to the bottom of this, at some point someone has to take the politically unpopular step of ending it."

For full story, click here.