Larry J. Ritchie

Photo of Larry J. Ritchie
Larry J. RitchieProfessor of Law

Contact Information

401-254-4635lritchie@rwu.eduCurriculum Vitae

Education

LL.M., Georgetown University
J.D., University of South Carolina
A.B., University of South Carolina

Professor Larry Ritchie teaches Torts, Criminal Procedure, Advanced Criminal Procedure, and Evidence at RWU.  While teaching at Georgetown Law School, he frequently served as court-appointed criminal defense or appellate counsel in the District of Columbia trial and appellate courts, U.S. Courts of Appeal for the D.C. and Fourth Circuits, and the U.S. Supreme Court.  His U.S. Supreme court cases U.S. v. Hale, U.S. v. Ross, and U.S. v. Henry remain staples in many criminal procedure textbooks.

Professor Ritchie spent many years in private practice both as a sole practitioner and as a member of the law firm Geltner & Ritchie in Washington, D.C.  His practice covered a wide variety of litigation including products liability, professional malpractice, personal injury, and criminal defense.  During the 1980s, Professor Ritchie served as the Director of an asbestos litigation unit while at the law office of Peter G. Angelos in Baltimore, MD.

Additionally, he served as the managing editor for the Trial Practice Series of publications at the Bureau of National Affairs in Washington, D.C.  He continues his professional involvement in the legal community through his work on the Criminal Justice Act panel for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and represents indigent criminal appellants in that court. 

Books

BNA Criminal Practice Manual (Washington, DC: Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., 1987)

BNA Civil Trial Manual (Washington, DC: Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., 1985)

Articles

Silence When Questioned by Police: Evidentiary and Constitutional LimitationsThe Champion, July/August 2014, at 44 (with Jennifer Read)

Justice in Rhode Island: Edson Toro and Procedural Default, 9 Roger Williams University Law Review 455 (2004)

The RICO Exception: Any Statement, by Any Member, at Any Time, Can Be Used Against You,  1Criminal Justice Weekly 297 (August 1999)

Compulsion Which Violates the Fifth Amendment: The Burger Court's Definition, 61 Minnesota Law Review 383 (1977)

Courses Taught

LAW.623Criminal Law

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Course Description

This course examines the general principles of substantive criminal law and concepts of mens rea, causation, parties, elements, criminal responsibility and capacity, justification, excuse and defenses.

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Core Course

Course Credits

3.0

Course Degree

Juris DoctorMaster of Studies in Law

LAW.645Evidence

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Course Description

This course introduces the law controlling the introduction and exclusion of evidence in civil and criminal trials. Topics include burden of proof, presumption, judicial notice, burden of production, burden of persuasion, competency of witnesses, relevancy, examinations of witnesses, privileges, hearsay, demonstrative evidence, documents and the function of judge and jury.

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Core Course

Course Credits

4.0

Course Degree

Juris DoctorMaster of Studies in Law

LSM.816Selected Issues in Criminal Procedure

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Course Description

This seminar will use several full-length, award-winning documentaries regarding specific criminal cases as fodder for the examination of timely criminal justice issues, primarily with a constitutional inquiry. Film verities allow the overlapping of doctrinal and practical problems for analysis, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Role-playing may be utilized. Topics covered will include: character evidence, investigative techniques, a variety of police and prosecutorial misconduct, racial and gender assumptions, mental health issues, evidence and emotions, the forensic science paradox, and epistemological questions regarding truth. The required paper may fulfill the graduation legal-writing requirement.

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Seminar

Course Credits

2.0

Course Degree

Juris DoctorMaster of Studies in Law

Faculty Associated

Larry J. Ritchie
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Course Types

We have classified RWU Law classes under the following headers. One of the following course types will be attached to each course which will allow students to narrow down their search while looking for classes.

Core Course

Students in the first and second year are required to take classes covering the following aspects of the law—contracts, torts, property, criminal law, civil procedure, and constitutional law, evidence, and professional responsibility.  Along with these aspects, the core curriculum will develop legal reasoning skills.

Elective

After finishing the core curriculum the remaining coursework toward the degree is completed through upper level elective courses.  Students can choose courses that peak their interests or courses that go along with the track they are following.

Seminar

Seminars are classes where teachers and small groups of students focus on a specific topic and the students complete a substantial research paper.

Clinics/Externships

Inhouse Clinics and Clinical Externships legal education is law school training in which students participate in client representation under the supervision of a practicing attorney or law professor.  RWU Law's Clinical Programs offer unique and effective learning opportunities and the opportunity for practical experience while still in law school.