Tanya J. Monestier

Photo of Tanya J. Monestier
Tanya J. MonestierDistinguished Research Professor of Law

Education

LL.M., Cambridge University 
LL.B., Osgoode Hall 
B.A., York University

After graduating first in her class from Osgoode Hall, one of Canada’s top law schools, Professor Tanya Monestier clerked for the Honourable Justice Frank Iacobucci of the Supreme Court of Canada. Subsequently, she earned her LL.M. with First Class Honours from the University of Cambridge, where she was both a Commonwealth Scholar and a Mackenzie King Travelling Scholar.

Professor Monestier was a visiting professor at Queen’s University where she taught Conflict of Laws, Commercial Law and Civil Procedure. She won the Queen’s Law Students’ Society Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2009. Professor Monestier’s academic articles on personal jurisdiction have been cited by numerous courts across Canada, including the Supreme Court of Canada, the Ontario Court of Appeal and the British Columbia Court of Appeal.  Her article,  “A 'Real and Substantial' Mess: The Law of Jurisdiction in Canada,” was selected for inclusion in Jurisdiction and Private International Law, a two-volume compilation of the leading academic work on personal jurisdiction in the common law world.

Professor Monestier previously worked as in-house counsel for the U.S. pharmaceutical company Purdue Pharma, specializing in product liability litigation. Professor Monestier teaches Contracts, Sales, Conflict of Laws, and Class Actions at RWU.

Articles

Forum Selection Clauses and Consumer Contracts in Canada, 36 Boston University International Law Journal 177 (2018)

You’re It! Tag Jurisdiction Over Corporations in Canada, 50 Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 583 (2017)

Whose Law of Personal Jurisdiction? The Choice of Law Problem in the Recognition of Foreign Judgments, 96 Boston University Law Review 1729 (2016)

Registration Statutes, General Jurisdiction, and the Fallacy of Consent, 36 Cardozo Law Review 1343 (2015)

Book Review, Cross-Border Torts: Canadian-US Litigation Strategies by Wyatt Pickett, 51 Canadian Yearbook of International Law 644 (2013)

Where is Home Depot "At Home"? Daimler v. Bauman and the End of Doing Business Jurisdiction, 66 Hastings Law Journal 233 (2014)

Jurisdiction and the Enforcement of Foreign Judgments, 42 The Advocates' Quarterly 107 (2013)

(Still) A “Real and Substantial” Mess: The Law of Jurisdiction in Canada, 36 Fordham International Law Journal 396 (2013)

Is Canada the New Shangri-La of Global Securities Class Actions?, 32 Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business 305 (2012)

Transnational Class Actions and the Illusory Search for Res Judicata, 86 Tulane Law Review 1 (2011)

A 'Real and Substantial' Improvement?: Van Breda Reformulates the Law of Jurisdiction in Ontario, 2010 Annual Review of Civil Litigation 185

Personal Jurisdiction Over Non-Resident Class Members: Have We Gone Down the Wrong Road? 45 Texas International Law Journal 537 (2010)

Lépine v. Canada Post: Ironing Out the Wrinkles in the Inter-provincial Enforcement of Class Judgments,34 The Advocates' Quarterly 499 (2008)

A 'Real and Substantial' Mess: The Law of Jurisdiction in Canada, 33 Queen's Law Journal 179 (2007)

Foreign Judgments At Common Law: Rethinking the Enforcement Rules, 28 Dalhousie Law Journal 163 (2005)

Nothing Comes of Nothing...Or Does it?  A Critical Re-Examination of the Doctrine of Separability in American Arbitration, 12 American Review of International Arbitration 223 (2001)

A Win-Win Proposition: The Viability of a Rule 23(B)(1)(b) Class Action in the American Mass Tort Context, published as part of the conference materials for the Canadian National Symposium on Class Actions, Osgoode Hall Professional Development Program, Sept. 2002; an abridged version of the article was published in Class Action Vol. I, No. 3, (2002)

Close Course Type Descriptions

Course Types

We have classified RWU Law classes under the following headers. One of the following course types will be attached to each course which will allow students to narrow down their search while looking for classes.

Core Course

Students in the first and second year are required to take classes covering the following aspects of the law—contracts, torts, property, criminal law, civil procedure, and constitutional law, evidence, and professional responsibility.  Along with these aspects, the core curriculum will develop legal reasoning skills.

Elective

After finishing the core curriculum the remaining coursework toward the degree is completed through upper level elective courses.  Students can choose courses that peak their interests or courses that go along with the track they are following.

Seminar

Seminars are classes where teachers and small groups of students focus on a specific topic and the students complete a substantial research paper.

Clinics/Externships

Inhouse Clinics and Clinical Externships legal education is law school training in which students participate in client representation under the supervision of a practicing attorney or law professor.  RWU Law's Clinical Programs offer unique and effective learning opportunities and the opportunity for practical experience while still in law school.